Explore crystal structures of the chemical elements through this periodic table
Group 1 2   3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
Period
1
1
1.008
2
4.0026
2
3
6.94
4
9.0122
5
10.81
6
12.011
7
14.007
8
15.999
9
18.998
10
20.180
3
11
22.990
12
24.305
13
26.982
14
28.085
15
30.974
16
32.06
17
35.45
18
39.948
4
19
39.098
20
40.078
21
44.956
22
47.867
23
50.942
24
51.996
25
54.938
26
55.845
27
58.933
28
58.693
29
63.546
30
65.38
31
69.723
32
72.63
33
74.922
34
78.96
35
79.904
36
83.798
5
37
85.468
38
87.62
39
88.906
40
91.224
41
92.906
42
95.96
43
[97.91]
44
101.07
45
102.91
46
106.42
47
107.87
48
112.41
49
114.82
50
118.71
51
121.76
52
127.60
53
126.90
54
131.29
6
55
132.91
56
137.33
*
71
174.97
72
178.49
73
180.95
74
183.84
75
186.21
76
190.23
77
192.22
78
195.08
79
196.97
80
200.59
81
204.38
82
207.2
83
208.98
84
[208.98]
85
[209.99]
86
[222.02]
7
87
[223.02]
88
[226.03]
**
103
[262.11]
104
[265.12]
105
[268.13]
106
[271.13]
107
[270]
108
[277.15]
109
[276.15]
110
[281.16]
111
[280.16]
112
[285.17]
113
[284.18]
114
[289.19]
115
[288.19]
116
[293]
117
[294]
118
[294]
 
*Lanthanoids *
57
138.91
58
140.12
59
140.91
60
144.24
61
[144.91]
62
150.36
63
151.96
64
157.25
65
158.93
66
162.50
67
164.93
68
167.26
69
168.93
70
173.05
**Actinoids **
89
[227.03]
90
232.04
91
231.04
92
238.03
93
[237.05]
94
[244.06]
95
[243.06]
96
[247.07]
97
[247.07]
98
[251.08]
99
[252.08]
100
[257.10]
101
[258.10]
102
[259.10]

The periodic table is a table of the chemical elements in which the elements are arranged by order of atomic number in such a way that the periodic properties (chemical periodicity) of the elements are made clear. The standard form of the table includes periods (usually horizontal in the periodic table) and groups (usually vertical). Elements in groups have some similar properties to each other. There is no one single or best structure for the periodic table but by whatever consensus there is, the form used here is very useful. The periodic table is a masterpiece of organised chemical information. The evolution of chemistry's periodic table into the current form is an astonishing achievement with major contributions from many famous chemists and other eminent scientists.

Latest news

On August 12th experiments involving zinc ions travelling at 10% of the speed of light colliding with a thin bismuth layer apparently produced a very heavy ion followed by a chain of six consecutive alpha decays identified as products of an isotope of element 113 278>Uut - see new evidence for elements 113.

Confirmation of the discoveries of and name proposals for elements 114 (flerovium) and 116 (livermorium)

A news reports from IUPAC (more about flerovium and livermorium) indicates the confirmation of the discoveries of elements 114 and 116: Discovery of the Elements with Atomic Number 114 and 116. Proposals by the discoverers for the names of the two elements have now announced as:

  • element 114: Flerovium (Fl) after the physicist Georgiy Flerov. Georgiy N. Flerov (1913-1990) was a renowned physicist who discovered the spontaneous fission of uranium and was a pioneer in heavy-ion physics.
  • element 116: Livermorium (Lv), after the Livermore laboratories. A group of researchers from the Laboratory, along with scientists at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, participated in the work carried out in Dubna on the synthesis of superheavy elements, including element 116.

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Periodic table cartograms poster The Orbitron atomic orbitals poster.
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Element 117 discovered?

A paper just published (5 April 2010) in Physical Review Letters by Yu. Ts. Oganessian and others claims the synthesis of a new element with atomic number 117. The abstract states "The discovery of a new chemical element with atomic number Z=117 is reported. The isotopes 293117 and 294117 were produced in fusion reactions between 48Ca and 249Bk. Decay chains involving eleven new nuclei were identified by means of the Dubna Gas Filled Recoil Separator. The measured decay properties show a strong rise of stability for heavier isotopes with Z>=111, validating the concept of the long sought island of enhanced stability for super-heavy nuclei." Read more: