Chemistry Nexus

by WebElements: the periodic table on the web

International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) have confirmed the names of elements 113, 115, 117, and 118 as:

  • Nihonium and symbol Nh, for element 113
  • Moscovium and symbol Mc, for element 115
  • Tennessine and symbol Ts, for element 117
  • Oganesson and symbol Og, for element 118

This followed a 5-month period of public review after which the names earlier proposed by the discoverers were approved by IUPAC.

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November 30th, 2016

Posted In: Chemical education, Periodic table, Radioactive elements

Wondering why the most expensive diamond ever (the Oppenheimer Blue, £35 million) is blue – it is because of boron impurities, element 5 in the periodic table.

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May 19th, 2016

Posted In: Chemistry

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A panel commentary in Nature Chemistry Commentary speculates upon the names that might be proposed for the four new elements in the periodic table. Worth a read, but we’ll have to wait a while longer yet.

Abstract: “Of all the things humans can bestow names upon, new chemical elements are about the rarest. Our group of periodic table experts attempts to read the tea leaves and predict the names for elements 113, 115, 117 and 118.”

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March 23rd, 2016

Posted In: Nuclear chemistry, Periodic table, Radioactive elements

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The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) has provisional recommendations for the naming of new elements and the recommendations are open for comment until 29 February 2016.

IUPAC state “the most important change is that the names of all new elements should have an ending that reflects and maintains historical and chemical consistency. This would be in general “-ium” for elements belonging to groups 1-16, “-ine” for elements of group 17 and “-on” for elements of group 18.”

The discoverers have the right to suggest names and symbols.

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February 24th, 2016

Posted In: Chemistry

Can you make your name, or any other word(s) come to that, from element symbols? Find out using this MyFunStudio script.

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December 10th, 2015

Posted In: Chemistry, Periodic table

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Well it’s Christmas so here are a few Christmasy chemistry links:

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December 10th, 2015

Posted In: Chemistry

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For those of you with access to Channel 4 in the UK, here is information about the The Royal Institution (RI) Christmas Lectures. See here for details of the 2015 lectures: how to survive in space.

Dr Kevin Fong opens a window onto today’s most exciting space missions, explores the future of space travel, and offers a unique insight into the challenges of protecting human life in the hostile environment of space in the 2015 Christmas lectures.

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December 10th, 2015

Posted In: Chemical education, Chemistry, Environmental chemistry

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WebElements now has the capability for authors on the site to embed easily interactive spectra using the JSpecView applet via bbcode using jspecview tags. This is achieved by writing:[jspecview=600,400]pclanilIR.jdx[/jspecview].

The =600,400 bit gives the desired spectrum size while the file name to be displayed is included between the tags. The file is uploaded by authors who are assigned rights to upload attachments.

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December 2nd, 2015

Posted In: Chemistry, Chemistry software

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There are many chemical web pages that display chemical structures within the web page itself. You, the viewer can then rotate the molecule on screen, read off bond lengths and angles, and do other useful things. To do this, a free piece of software known as a plug-in is required. There are at least two plugins available for you to use.

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December 2nd, 2015

Posted In: Chemistry

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This site now has the ability to display molecules interactively via the Jmol Java applet. This should mean that some stories or articles may come to mean a little more. As an example:[jmol=300]H3N-BF3.mol[/jmol]The motivation for this came from CHMEMCONF Spring 2006 and in particular Bob Hanson’s paper. With Bob’s encouragment, what I’ve done here is made a small extension to the software I’m using here (Drupal so that molecules can be embedded simply with a bbcode type string, in this case: [jmol=300]H3N-BF3.mol[/jmol]I’ll issue a note with more details on how to do this after further work.Can’t see anything above?

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December 2nd, 2015

Posted In: Chemistry

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