Chemistry Nexus

by WebElements: the periodic table on the web

For those of you with access to Channel 4 in the UK, here is information about the The Royal Institution (RI) Christmas Lectures. See here for details of the 2015 lectures: how to survive in space.

Dr Kevin Fong opens a window onto today’s most exciting space missions, explores the future of space travel, and offers a unique insight into the challenges of protecting human life in the hostile environment of space in the 2015 Christmas lectures.

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December 10th, 2015

Posted In: Chemical education, Chemistry, Environmental chemistry

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IUPAC have modified provisional recommendations for naming new elements as follows:

A procedure is proposed to name new chemical elements.  After the discovery of a new element is established by the joint IUPAC-IUPAP Working Group, the discoverers are invited to propose a name and a symbol to the IUPAC Inorganic Chemistry Division.  Elements can be named after a mythological concept, a mineral, a place or country, a property or a scientist.

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December 8th, 2015

Posted In: Nuclear chemistry

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There are many chemical web pages that display chemical structures within the web page itself. You, the viewer can then rotate the molecule on screen, read off bond lengths and angles, and do other useful things. To do this, a free piece of software known as a plug-in is required. There are at least two plugins available for you to use.

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December 2nd, 2015

Posted In: Chemistry

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WebElements now has the capability for authors on the site to embed easily interactive spectra using the JSpecView applet via bbcode using jspecview tags. This is achieved by writing:[jspecview=600,400]pclanilIR.jdx[/jspecview].

The =600,400 bit gives the desired spectrum size while the file name to be displayed is included between the tags. The file is uploaded by authors who are assigned rights to upload attachments.

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December 2nd, 2015

Posted In: Chemistry, Chemistry software

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This site now has the ability to display molecules interactively via the Jmol Java applet. This should mean that some stories or articles may come to mean a little more. As an example:[jmol=300]H3N-BF3.mol[/jmol]The motivation for this came from CHMEMCONF Spring 2006 and in particular Bob Hanson’s paper. With Bob’s encouragment, what I’ve done here is made a small extension to the software I’m using here (Drupal so that molecules can be embedded simply with a bbcode type string, in this case: [jmol=300]H3N-BF3.mol[/jmol]I’ll issue a note with more details on how to do this after further work.Can’t see anything above?

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December 2nd, 2015

Posted In: Chemistry

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The WebElements news system is up and running. Many people use a news reader such as NetNewsWire to keep track of news. If you would like to track the WebElements news here is the address: http://www.webelements.com/nexus/feed/

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December 1st, 2015

Posted In: Chemistry

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This is for web authors.

Have a look at JSmol where you can find information about the JSMol molecule viewer. With this you can publish chemical structures in your web pages and it usually works just fine provided your viewers have fast access to the internet. For an example of JSmol in action try this VSEPR tutorial.

Quote: “JSmol is a JavaScript framework that allows web developers to create pages that utilize either Java or HTML5 (no Java), at will.

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December 1st, 2015

Posted In: Chemistry, Computational chemistry

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POS0006-A2-cartograms-2010-800I am delighted to announce that we have a periodic table cartograms poster available for sale at the WebElements shop.

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November 25th, 2015

Posted In: Chemistry, Periodic table

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A paper accepted Aug 2013 and published in September 2013  entitled Spectroscopy of element 115 decay chains by D. Rudolph et al. provides additional evidence for element 115.1

Abstract

A high-resolution α X-ray and γ-ray coincidence spectroscopy experiment was conducted at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung. Thirty correlated α-decay chains were detected following the fusion-evaporation reaction 48Ca + 243Am.

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August 28th, 2013

Posted In: Chemistry, Group 15 elements, Nuclear chemistry, Radioactive elements

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Emma and Katie make the periodic table in iced biscuits as refreshments for a reception following a lecture on fireworks at The University of Sheffield.

periodic-biscuits-2

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February 26th, 2013

Posted In: Chemical education

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