Feed aggregator

Molecular Crowding Accelerates Ribozyme Docking and Catalysis

J. Am. Chem. Soc. - 21 November, 2014 - 11:58

TOC Graphic

Journal of the American Chemical SocietyDOI: 10.1021/ja5073146

Theoretical Analysis of Microtubule Dynamics at All Times

J. Phys. Chem. B - 21 November, 2014 - 11:56

TOC Graphic

The Journal of Physical Chemistry BDOI: 10.1021/jp507206f

Countdown to the 2014 Chemistry World science communication competition

Chemistry World blog (RSC) - 21 November, 2014 - 11:05

In this first of a series of guest posts, Elizabeth Tasker writes about the how and why of her piece on cosmic chemistry, which was shortlisted in the 2013 Chemistry World science communication competition.

Elizabeth TaskerThere are some stories that beg to be written. When you find an experimental astrophysicist building a star-forming cloud in his laboratory, there is practically a moral obligation to remind the world that there are no boxes for ideas.

Astrophysicists usually come in three flavours: observers (telescope kids), theorists (‘The Matrix’ universes) and instrument builders (hand me a hammer). We cannot typically perform laboratory experiments since putting a star (or planet or black hole) on a workbench is distinctly problematic. The closest we come to hands-on experiments is through computer models, which is the toolkit I use when studying the formation of star-forming clouds. However, Naoki Watanabe had gone ahead and built his own cloud  in a super-cooled vacuum chamber.

What I liked most about Naoki’s work was the science question that was the heart of his project. Rather than take the tools of a given discipline and ask what could be learned, Naoki had picked the question and then drew knowledge he needed from astronomy, atomic physics and chemistry. This mingling of traditionally discrete subjects also made it a great fit for Chemistry World’s 2013 science communication competition theme of ‘openness’.

Discovering I’d been shortlisted was amazing. This feeling was briefly replaced by terror, since I was asked to produce a video clip describing my article as I was unable to attend the prize ceremony itself.

I recorded and re-recorded the video 10 times. All of them were identical. I feel there is a lesson to be learned about perfectionism that I likely failed to entirely grasp.

It was great to know that the judges had both enjoyed my article and were as excited as me about interdisciplinary work. Perhaps it is time to stop calling myself an ‘astrophysicist’ and simply say ‘scientist’.

Elizabeth Tasker is an assistant professor in astrophysics at Hokkaido University in Japan, where she explores star formation though computational modeling. Originally from the UK, Elizabeth completed her MSci in theoretical physics at Durham University, before pursuing her doctorate at the University of Oxford. Elizabeth keeps her own blog. She is working on a book on exoplanets (The planet factory), which will be published in 2016.

 

If you are passionate about science and science communication, the 2014 Chemistry World science communication competition on the topic of chemistry and art offers a fantastic opportunity to demonstrate your skill, win £500 and be published in Chemistry World.

Digg This  Reddit This  Stumble Now!  Share on Facebook  Bookmark this on Delicious  Share on LinkedIn  Bookmark this on Technorati  Post on Twitter  Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)  
Categories: Education

Excited-State Proton Transfer Dynamics of Firefly’s Chromophore D-Luciferin in DMSO–Water Binary Mixture

J. Phys. Chem. B - 21 November, 2014 - 05:54

TOC Graphic

The Journal of Physical Chemistry BDOI: 10.1021/jp510389d

Free Energy Simulations of Active-Site Mutants of Dihydrofolate Reductase

J. Phys. Chem. B - 21 November, 2014 - 05:35

TOC Graphic

The Journal of Physical Chemistry BDOI: 10.1021/jp5059963

Microencapsulation of Active Ingredients Using PDMS as Shell Material

Macromolecules - 21 November, 2014 - 05:35

TOC Graphic

MacromoleculesDOI: 10.1021/ma501897j

Acetylene bubble-powered autonomous capsules: towards in situ fuel

Chem. Commun. - 20 November, 2014 - 21:17

Chem. Commun., 2014, 50,15849-15851
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC07218A, CommunicationJames Guo Sheng Moo, Hong Wang, Martin Pumera
A fuel-free autonomous self-propelled motor powered by acetylene bubbles is illustrated.
The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry

Continuous synthesis of graphene sheets by spray pyrolysis and their uses as catalysts for fuel cells

Chem. Commun. - 20 November, 2014 - 21:17
Chem. Commun., 2014, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC08197H, CommunicationJian Nong Wang, Biao Zou, Xiao Xia Wang, Xin Xin Huang
Graphene sheets (GNS) were synthesized continuously by spray pyrolysis of iron carbonyl and pyridine. The Pt catalyst supported on GNS exhibited an excellent durability for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The...
The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry

Preparation of reduced graphite oxide with high volumetric capacitance in supercapacitor

Chem. Commun. - 20 November, 2014 - 21:17
Chem. Commun., 2014, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC08038F, CommunicationYueming Li, Dan Zhao
Reduced graphite oxide with high density was prepared via a novel precipitation assisted method, and micropore area is found to be above 70% in the total surface area for as...
The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry

Dynamic Stereoisomerization in Inherently Chiral Bimetallic [2]Catenanes

Chem. Commun. - 20 November, 2014 - 21:17
Chem. Commun., 2014, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC07392D, CommunicationAli Trabolsi, Thirumugan Prakasam, Matteo Lusi, Elisa Nauha, John-Carl Olsen, mohamadou Sy, Carlos Platas-Iglesias, Loic Charbonniere
Stereoisomerization and the unprecedented phenomenon of metal translocation in the absence of redox processes were probed in two inherently chiral bimetallic [2]catenanes by using a combination of variable-temperature 1H NMR...
The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry

A Nile Blue Based Infrared Fluorescent Probe: Imaging tumors that over-express Cyclooxygenase-2

Chem. Commun. - 20 November, 2014 - 21:17
Chem. Commun., 2014, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC08915D, CommunicationJiangli Fan, Benhua Wang, Xianwu Wang, Hao Zhu, Jingyun Wang, Huiying Mu, Xiaojun Peng
The first Golgi-localized cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-specific near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence probe, Niblue-C6-IMC, able to detect cancer cells was designed. Importantly, Niblue-C6-IMC preferentially labeled the tumors in mouse tumor model with deep tissue...
The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry

3-Pyrrolyl-oxindoles as efficient nucleophiles for organocatalytic asymmetric synthesis of structurally diverse 3,3'-disubstituted oxindole derivatives

Chem. Commun. - 20 November, 2014 - 21:17
Chem. Commun., 2014, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC08364D, CommunicationBao-Dong Cui, Yong You, Jian-Qiang Zhao, Jian Zuo, Zhi-Jun Wu, Xiao-Ying Xu, Xiao-Mei Zhang, Weicheng Yuan
A range of 3-pyrrolyl-3,3'-disubstituted oxindoles were smoothly obtained via the reaction of 3-pyrrolyl-oxindoles with nitroalkenes by organocatalyst. The usefulness of the protocol was also demonstrated by the versatile conversions of...
The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry

Oligonucleotide-capped mesoporous silica nanoparticles as DNA-responsive dye delivery systems for genomic DNA detection

Chem. Commun. - 20 November, 2014 - 21:17
Chem. Commun., 2014, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC08306G, CommunicationLluis Pascual, Isabel Baroja, Elena Aznar, Felix Sancenon, Maria Dolores Marcos, Jose R. Murguia, Pedro Amoros del Torro, Knut Rurack, Ramon Martinez-Manez
New hybrid oligonucleotide-capped mesoporous silica nanoparticles able to detect genomic DNA were designed
The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry

Ternary synthesis of colloidal Zn3P2 quantum dots

Chem. Commun. - 20 November, 2014 - 21:17

Chem. Commun., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC08068H, CommunicationBenjamin A. Glassy, Brandi M. Cossairt
The synthesis and characterization of crystalline colloidal zinc phosphide quantum dots with observable excitonic transitions ranging between 424-535 nm (2.3-2.9 eV) are reported.
To cite this article before page numbers are assigned, use the DOI form of citation above.
The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry

A bio-catalytically driven Janus mesoporous silica cluster motor with magnetic guidance

Chem. Commun. - 20 November, 2014 - 21:17

Chem. Commun., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC08285K, CommunicationXing Ma, Samuel Sanchez
A bio-catalytic Janus motor based on the mesoporous silica cluster (JMSC) is fabricated.
To cite this article before page numbers are assigned, use the DOI form of citation above.
The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry

A hyperbranched supramolecular polymer constructed by orthogonal triple hydrogen bonding and host-guest interactions

Chem. Commun. - 20 November, 2014 - 21:17
Chem. Commun., 2014, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC08533G, CommunicationDahui Qu, Ruirui Gu, Jian Yao, Xin Fu, Wei Zhou
A hyperbranched supramolecular polymer has been constructed through orthogonal self-crosslinking by two classical binding interactions: triple hydrogen bonding interaction between a three-arm melamine derivative and DB24C8-containing bisimide and host-guest interaction...
The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry

WebElements: the periodic table on the WWW [http://www.webelements.com/]

Copyright 1993-2011 Mark Winter [The University of Sheffield and WebElements Ltd, UK]. All rights reserved.