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High-sensitivity fluorescence imaging of iron in plant tissues

Chem. Commun. - 10 July, 2014 - 11:17

Chem. Commun., 2014, 50,8547-8549
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC02132K, CommunicationMi-Jeong Park, Hak-Sung Jung, Young-Jae Kim, Young-Ju Kwon, Jin-Kyu Lee, Chung-Mo Park
Fluorescence imaging of Fe ions in (a) leaf epidermal cells, (b) the stem, and (c) the root stem of Arabidopsis plants by the rapid, simple, and inexpensive photoinduced electron transfer (PET) fluorescent probing method.
The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry

Polynorbornene derived 8-hydroxyquinoline paper strips for ultrasensitive chemical nerve agent surrogate sensing

Chem. Commun. - 10 July, 2014 - 11:17

Chem. Commun., 2014, 50,8511-8513
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC03361B, CommunicationOpen Access Open Access Creative Commons Licence&nbsp This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported Licence.Santu Sarkar, Raja Shunmugam
The detection of nerve agent simulants is achieved by the photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism.
The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry

Coordination polymers for catalysis: enhancement of catalytic activity through hierarchical structuring

Chem. Commun. - 10 July, 2014 - 11:17

Chem. Commun., 2014, 50,8543-8546
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC02909G, CommunicationFan-Xing Bu, Ming Hu, Li Xu, Qi Meng, Gui-Yun Mao, Dong-Mei Jiang, Ji-Sen Jiang
Hierarchical Prussian white (PW) crystals were synthesized by using a self-aggregation and etching strategy. The crystals exhibit superior catalytic activity in degradation of methylene blue to the non-hierarchical PW crystals.
The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry

Synthesis of monolayer platinum nanosheets

Chem. Commun. - 10 July, 2014 - 11:17

Chem. Commun., 2014, 50,8503-8506
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC02527J, CommunicationA. Funatsu, H. Tateishi, K. Hatakeyama, Y. Fukunaga, T. Taniguchi, M. Koinuma, H. Matsuura, Y. Matsumoto
Platinum (Pt) nanosheets were developed by exfoliating layered platinum oxide. Moreover, we succeeded in synthesizing monolayer Pt nanosheets for the first time by adjusting the conditions for reduction. Monolayer Pt nanosheets were highly active in oxygen reduction reaction.
The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry

[3+3] annulation of allylic phosphoryl-stabilized carbanions/phosphorus ylides and vinyl azides: a practice strategy for synthesis of polyfunctionalized anilines

Chem. Commun. - 10 July, 2014 - 11:17

Chem. Commun., 2014, 50,8539-8542
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC03462G, CommunicationShen Liu, Wenteng Chen, Jing Luo, Yongping Yu
Tandem Michael addition and Witting or Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons olefination initiated [3+3] annulation between vinyl azides and allylic phosphorus ylides or allylic phosphoryl-stabilized carbanions has been developed.
The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry

Dave Bradley Music

Sciencebase - 8 July, 2014 - 08:43

itunes-logo bandcamp-logo amazon-mp3Click the button above to buy Dave Bradley’s Wishful Thinking album from BandCamp or other songs on iTunes and amazon mp3. There’s also my more recent 4-track Radio Edit EP on BandCamp.

Other original songs from DB are also available on ReverbNation and Dave Bradley (covers EP on Loudr.FM).

In case you didn’t know, I wear three hats: a science journalist’s green eyeshade, a backwards turned baseball cap for shooting photographs and a really trendy felt hat for writing songs…well, not really. But I have written and recorded a bunch of acoustic and electric songs perhaps reflecting my eclectic tastes and influences. Genre? That’s a tough call – acoustic indie pop-rock retro new wave electro jazz alt funk prog? That probably covers all bases.

dave-bradley-wishful-thinkingAlbum on BandCamp.

Athlete, The Beatles, Daft Punk, David Bowie, Kate Bush, Elbow, Peter Gabriel, Led Zeppelin, Mumford & Sons, The Police, Gerry Rafferty, R.E.M., Nile Rodgers, Rush, The Smiths, Rod Stewart, Paul Weller, John Denver, Bacharach & David, The Who and others. Apparently, I occasionally sound like a Geordie Glenn Tilbrook, and sometimes a blend of Steely Dan and David Bowie…

Dave Bradley Music is a post from the science blog of science journalist, photographer and musician David Bradley
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Categories: Science Blogs

Just a moderate bee sting

Sciencebase - 2 July, 2014 - 08:55

When the garden lawn is covered in blooming clover (Trifolium) and the last few honeybees (Apis mellifera) that haven’t yet succumbed to colony collapse disorder are busy about their floral business, it’s probably a good idea to not walk around barefoot in the garden with one’s reading glasses on, it would help avoid all that embarrassing hopping about in blooming apitoxin-induced pain…caused mainly by melittin (Glycyl-L-isoleucylglycyl-L-alanyl-L-valyl-L-leucyl-L-lysyl-L-valyl-L-leucyl-L-threonyl-L-threonylglycyl-L-leucyl-L-prolyl-L-alanyl-L-leucyl-L-isoleucyl-L-seryl-L-tryptophyl-L-isoleucyl-L-lysyl-L-argin yl-L-lysyl-L-arginyl-L-glutaminyl-L-glutamamide)

bee-sting-venom-melittin

UPDATE: Three days later. Sole of my foot is swollen, sore, red, hot to the touch and feels as if there’s a piece of tough leather just below the skin…nice…so headed to the Mayo Clinic website for their take on bee stings. Apparently, my sting is merely moderate, I can barely put my shoe on, so yeah, moderate. A mild reaction would have subsided within a few hours. Conversely, a severe reaction might involve: skin reactions, including hives and itching and flushed or pale skin, difficulty breathing, swelling of the throat and tongue, a weak, rapid pulse, nausea, vomiting or diarrhoea, dizziness or fainting, loss of consciousness. Thankfully, Mayo says that a moderate reaction this time does not predispose one to a severe allergic reaction on next apian encounter.

moderate-reaction-beesting

Honeybee photo by David Bradley Photographer

Just a moderate bee sting is a post from the science blog of science journalist, photographer and musician David Bradley
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June 2014: Diversity Special

Royal Society R.Science - 30 June, 2014 - 16:01

This podcast from the Royal Society has moved.

Please resubscribe to the podcast here:
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Categories: Education

Grow crops from open-source seed

Sciencebase - 25 June, 2014 - 08:20

The three bullet points:

  • Many poor farmers use low-quality local seed rather than expensive patented ones
  • The Open Source Seed Initiative is offering 36 types of 14 food crops
  • All seed packets contain a pledge stating that the seed can be used freely

‘Open-source’ seed released to nurture patent-free food – SciDev.Net.

Grow crops from open-source seed is a post from the science blog of science journalist, photographer and musician David Bradley
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Categories: Science Blogs

A five-step plan for nano

Sciencebase - 23 June, 2014 - 14:56

A five-stage, and very demanding protocol, for taking a nanoscience discovery to a consumer nanotechnology product has been outlined by engineer Michael Kelly of the University of Cambridge. Kelly, who is also based at the MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, explains how a clear understanding of how and why experimental silicon semiconductor and liquid crystal technology took so long to move from the laboratory bench to the manufacturing plant and mass production and consumption should underpin predictions about current nanoscience.

Kelly also explains why once a technology, such as the silicon chip, is in place it is very difficult to usurp even with advances such as conducting polymers and novel forms of carbon from buckyballs (fullerenes) and nanotubes to graphene despite the hyperbole that surrounds such novel materials. He points out that too little attention is paid to the many hurdles facing the nanoscientist hoping to be revolutionary nanotechnologist. But, his systematic protocol reveals what the aspirational need to know in making that quantum leap.

If one is working towards nanotechnology, then one must first identify the environment in which a new nanomaterial will be superior to the current state-of-the art material, otherwise the science becomes a solution looking for a problem. There are a few examples of fundamental science, the laser being a rare example, where uses are found after the fact, but, Kelly suggests that, in a burgeoning field with myriad projects and experiments final outcomes do not commonly justify the initial effort.

Secondly, it is important to identify the critical properties of the new nanomaterial and to be able to reproduce them absolutely in different samples with values to within better than 10 percent of the mean or there is no possibility of mass production. He points out that semiconductor tunnelling devices have only very recently addressed this problem.

Thirdly, a way to make the material or device with pre-specified performance and at high yield is essential from an early stage of development or again wasted raw materials will keep end product costs too high for a product to be commercially viable.

Kelly’s fourth commandment asserts that for a product, one must be able to simulate its performance from first principles and to readily invert properties at any stage of development so that it might be reverse engineered and adapted to resolve discrepancies where a device deviates from design.

Fifth and finally, even if the first four steps of the protocol are addressed adequately lifetime performance must be demonstrated as being superior to any current state-of-the art technology. He cites multi-heterojunction tandem solar cell technology as being on the cusp of serious development in this regard, one might also mention organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and their development from unstable devices in the early 1990s to fully fledged commercial technology today.

The shift from traditional manufacturing to the current developments based on novel and even designer materials means that industry now places great emphasis on product development taking place at the laboratory bench and expects much more than a one-off result before adopting new science and converting it into technology, nano or otherwise.

Research Blogging IconKelly M.J. (2014). From nanoscience to nanotechnology: what can and what cannot be manufactured, International Journal of Nanotechnology, 11 (5/6/7/8) 441. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1504/ijnt.2014.060563

A five-step plan for nano is a post from the science blog of science journalist, photographer and musician David Bradley
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Categories: Science Blogs

Reactive Sabbatical

Reactive Reports - 6 May, 2014 - 16:16

As you may have noticed, Reactive Reports has been somewhat less active than it was during its golden years, 1999 to 2009. I am still writing lots about chemistry and science in general, but updating the various blogs and websites where there is no longer a commissioning editor, as it were, has had to take a backseat in preference to the writing that pays the bills in order to allow me to indulge my other creative passions – music and photography.

I’ve always used some of my own photos where I could to illustrate blogs, news and features and websites, you can see some of my recent albums via my flickr pages. During the last year or so I have been fine-tuning (hahah) my songwriting and production skills to put together an eclectic collection of originals, some acoustic and folky, some electric and indie, a few funky, and one a bit long and proggy. Anyway, the fruits of that musical labour are now available from the usual online musical outlets including BandCamp.

Categories: Science Blogs

Here's to the future

J. Material Chem. - 9 December, 2012 - 10:17

J. Mater. Chem., 2012, 22,24981-24982
DOI: 10.1039/C2JM90176E, Editorial
Liz Dunn (Editor) and Seth Marder (Chair of the Editorial Board) commemorate Journal of Materials Chemistry and look back over some of the highlights of the last 22 years.
The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry

Improved anti-proliferative effect of doxorubicin-containing polymer nanoparticles upon surface modification with cationic groups

J. Material Chem. - 9 December, 2012 - 10:17

J. Mater. Chem., 2012, 22,25463-25470
DOI: 10.1039/C2JM35420A, PaperSai Archana Krovi, Elden P. Swindell, Thomas V. O'Halloran, SonBinh T. Nguyen
Cationic functionalization stabilizes doxorubicin-containing polymer nanoparticles against aggregation and improved their anti-proliferative effect against MDA-MB-231-Br cancer cells.
The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry

Synthesis of high-charge capacity triarylamine-thiophene redox electrodes using electrochemical copolymerization

J. Material Chem. - 5 December, 2012 - 09:17

J. Mater. Chem., 2012, 22,25447-25452
DOI: 10.1039/C2JM35472A, PaperJeremy T. Kearns, Mark E. Roberts
High-charge capacity redox electrodes are prepared via electrochemical copolymerization with improved electrochemical properties relative to the homopolymers.
The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry

Lipophilic and cationic triphenylphosphonium grafted linear polyethylenimine polymers for efficient gene delivery to mammalian cells

J. Material Chem. - 5 December, 2012 - 09:17

J. Mater. Chem., 2012, 22,25427-25436
DOI: 10.1039/C2JM35243E, PaperR. Bansal, S. K. Tripathi, K. C. Gupta, P. Kumar
Cationic and lipophilic butyltriphenylphosphonium bromide has been tethered to lPEI, and the resulting BTP-g-lP polymers have been shown to deliver nucleic acids efficiently into mammalian cells.
The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry

Pyrene-directed growth of nanoporous benzimidazole-linked nanofibers and their application to selective CO2 capture and separation

J. Material Chem. - 3 December, 2012 - 08:54

J. Mater. Chem., 2012, 22,25409-25417
DOI: 10.1039/C2JM34922A, PaperMohammad Gulam Rabbani, Ali Kemal Sekizkardes, Oussama M. El-Kadri, Bilal R. Kaafarani, Hani M. El-Kaderi
Highly porous pyrene-derived benzimidazole-linked nanofibers exhibit very high CO2 and H2 binding affinities and a remarkable CO2 uptake and selectivity over methane and nitrogen making the fibers very attractive for use in hydrogen storage and post-combustion CO2 capture applications.
The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry

Vacuum thermally evaporated polymeric zinc acrylate as an organic interlayer of organic/inorganic multilayer passivation for flexible organic thin-film transistors

J. Material Chem. - 27 November, 2012 - 07:17

J. Mater. Chem., 2012, 22,25395-25401
DOI: 10.1039/C2JM34760A, PaperWon Min Yun, Jaeyoung Jang, Sooji Nam, Yong Jin Jeong, Lae Ho Kim, Seyeol Park, Sang Joon Seo, Chan Eon Park
Vacuum thermally evaporated polymeric zinc acrylate (pZA) was applied as an organic interlayer for the multilayer passivation of flexible OTFTs.
The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry

Themed issue: nanomaterials for energy conversion and storage

J. Material Chem. - 27 November, 2012 - 07:17

J. Mater. Chem., 2012, 22,24190-24194
DOI: 10.1039/C2JM90163C, EditorialK. Kalyanasundaram, M. Gratzel
Guest editors Michael Gratzel and Kuppuswamy Kalyanasundaram introduce this Journal of Materials Chemistry themed issue on nanomaterials for energy conversion and storage.
The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry

Structural and defect properties of the LaPO4 and LaP5O14-based proton conductors

J. Material Chem. - 27 November, 2012 - 07:17

J. Mater. Chem., 2012, 22,25388-25394
DOI: 10.1039/C2JM32940A, PaperSatyajit Phadke, Juan C. Nino, M. Saiful Islam
Atomistic simulation techniques are used to perform a comparative study of intrinsic defects, dopant incorporation and protonic groups in two lanthanum phosphate compounds, namely, the orthophosphate (LaPO4) and the ultraphosphate (LaP5O14).
The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry

Preparation of supported hydrodesulfurization catalysts with enhanced performance using Mo-based inorganic-organic hybrid nanocrystals as a superior precursor

J. Material Chem. - 25 November, 2012 - 06:54

J. Mater. Chem., 2012, 22,25340-25353
DOI: 10.1039/C2JM34979E, PaperWei Han, Pei Yuan, Yu Fan, Gang Shi, Haiyan Liu, Danjiang Bai, Xiaojun Bao
Alumina-supported hydrodesulfurization catalysts with enhanced performance were prepared by using Mo-based inorganic-organic hybrid nanocrystals as a novel precursor.
The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry

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