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Science blog from freelance science journalist David Bradley
Updated: 5 days 8 hours ago

iPads, I-PADs and community defibrillators

4 March, 2014 - 10:05

One of our local villages did some very worthwhile fundraising to buy a public defibrillator. From the picture on the Cambridge News site, it looks like they opted for an iPad AED from Korean company CU Medical Systems. Now, that’s all well and good, and well done on their part for the cash raised, but isn’t there likely to be some confusion, given the existence of the Apple tablet computer called an iPad?

ipad-defibrillator

I don’t know who had the trademark on iPad first, although CU Medical has various formats on its website for its IPAD, I-PAD products. IPAD, apparently stands for “intelligent Public Access Defibrillator”. This is something of a trademark #fail, surely?

There are several issues. Are people buying this particular brand because they think it has something to do with Apple? When they search for replacement batteries on eBay or elsewhere are they coming unstuck when they receive a unit for the Apple product rather than their defib? Is there confusion in the application of the device where members of the public might otherwise assist a heart patient but are concerned that they didn’t bring their Apple iPad with them? Moreover, there were reports a while back that the magnets in an Apple iPad could “switch off” implanted defib devices (see Forbes for example).

Maybe I’m overthinking this, but a medical first responder friend had similar qualms. Of course, the trademark people might argue that these products do not share the same commercial space, but there is overlap when it comes to them both being electronic devices and requiring batteries and the use of the word “intelligent” might lead people to draw the wrong conclusions about whether they need an Apple iPad to use the defib.

Now, there are lots of companies that use other people’s acronyms, I’ve seen “Bert’s Building Corporation” (BBC) vans driving around these here parts and there’s a pet fish company called NASA (Nellie’s Aquatic Services and Accessories) I’m sure. They’re not likely to ever be confused with their larger institutional counterparts in media, rocket science and telescopes though? If CUM made “iPads” before Apple, then there needs to be a discussion between their lawyers, if there hasn’t already been one, and one of the parties involved needs to come up with an alternative name for their device, methinks. I wonder how people in Poland get on with the http://ap.pl website, which seems to be selling Apple products and other stuff…although http://a.pl is a delicatessen.

iPad defibrillator.

iPads, I-PADs and community defibrillators is a post from the science blog of David Bradley, author of Deceived Wisdom
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Escape to the Stars – the video

2 March, 2014 - 15:50

As if having Eddie Bryant record a dual sax part for my song “Escape to the Stars” wasn’t fantastic enough I’ve got permission to edit up a journey into space video montage from Luigi Quattrocchi from his original tribute to Hubble!

The song is about the whimsical and fantastical notion that if we mess up this planet we could somehow pioneer a new home among the stars…

Escape to the Stars

Over the water, no anchor out at sea
Islands will be washed away by change

Climbing up our mountain believing we’re free
Emptiness that clings hides only rage

You’ll see them as they struggle through the years that roll by
You know that they’ll try their best but in destiny they’ll die

But the air is poisoned, so there’s nowhere left to hide
Could we leave behind this empty shell with no pride?

Ever looking upwards it’s the stars that draw us near
If stardust’s what we’re made from then our fate is ever clear

Over the water, no anchor out at sea
Our island washed away by change

Know how we struggled as the light years flew by
Know that we suffered for the dreams we left to die

And the air that we poisoned, left us nowhere else to hide
So, we left behind that empty shell and our pride

Words & Music by Dave Bradley
Vocals, guitars DB
Sax solo Eddie Bryant Andoran
Recorded in the ScienceBASS Studios
Video montage courtesy of Luigi Quattrocchi – Impermanence

More information imagingstorm.co.uk/escape-to-the-stars.html

Escape to the Stars – the video is a post from the science blog of David Bradley, author of Deceived Wisdom
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Making a point with a picture -graphorisms

1 March, 2014 - 10:44

You’ve seen them all over the internet, from Instagram to Facebook from Twitter to Plurk (remember that), they’re often just called “memes” (after Richard Dawkins’ term for a self-replicating piece of knowledge analogous to a self-replicating gene in biology). Often they supposedly inspirational or educational phrases or sayings that people share in the vain hope of changing other people’s minds and behaviours. Aphorisms in graphical form, so I coined the mortmanteau graphorism to make a point about making a point with a picture.

graphorism-ahead

Making a point with a picture -graphorisms is a post from the science blog of David Bradley, author of Deceived Wisdom
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All that MRI jazz

1 March, 2014 - 07:00

Brain scans reveal that different parts of the brain light up when jazz musicians are improvising and “trading fours”, when they’re engrossed in spontaneous, improvisational musical conversation. The specific parts of the brain that are activated are those associated with the interpretation of the structure of phrases and sentences, the syntactics. Conversely, the musical “conversation” leads to reduced activity in brain areas linked to meaning, the semantics. I report more details in my latest column on the MRI channel at SpectroscopyNOW.com, but I also spoke to Joe Thompson, Musical Director of London’s “The Club at the Ivy” to get a jazz musician’s perspective on the research.

piano-keys

“Exchanging fours with a great jazz musician offers a freedom of expression far greater than the spoken word can ever hope to obtain,” he told me. “At best, it is a dialogue of emotions, a communion of feelings. Youre contradicting, testing each other, challenging and daring each other. You’re sharing experiences, enjoying a joke and a laugh. It’s a game of tennis, a fight, a dual. It is meticulously calculated one moment and blind risk the next. It’s a dance, a shared tribute. One minute you are Andy Murray and Rafael Nadal, the next you are Torville and Dean, Morecambe and Wise, whoever you want to be. A random blend of the highly sophisticated and the base, it can be highly cerebral as well as utterly naive. You share, you compliment, you clash. It’s a two-minute marriage.”

Thompson, who has collaborated with Elvis Costello and Diana Krall among others, suggests that it can feel primeval. “The most exciting, provoking, fulfilling exchange of fours I had (on piano) was with a guy on a djembe (African drum). He not only made me do things I didn’t know I could do, I played things I didn’t know I wanted to play,” he confessed.

There is a suggestion that a musical exchange somehow bypasses the brain, at least that is hw it feels to Thompson. “You are spontaneously playing what you feel at the precise moment you feel it,” he adds. “You breathe his music in, and your music out. How you play and what you play depends on many things. The best improvising is of the moment and in the moment. Compared to all of this, a spoken dialogue is a walk in the park.”

Of course, he points out that when we communicate with each other we are doing a lot more than listening to, processing and returning the spoken word. “In close-up, face to face dialogue, all of the senses are used, as they are when playing music with someone,” he says. “Is the brain working harder in the jazz dialogue than in a situation where a terrified bloke is chatting up the love of his life, knowing he only has one shot at it? Who knows? But, I don’t think you need an MRI to tell you that the brain is working in similar ways in each situation.”

From the scientific perspective, we do need that MRI scan to provide the physical evidence for what is happening in the brain and you can read the details on SpectroscopyNOW.

All that MRI jazz is a post from the science blog of David Bradley, author of Deceived Wisdom
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Remote, quantally channelled kinetic agitation

22 February, 2014 - 15:00

There are several scientists acting like the proverbial sharp stick, constantly poking the balloons of alternative remedy quacks until they burst. They assess the latest nonsensical claims of so-called complementary medicine and then give it a good poke with the sharp end. I do wonder if they ever manage to guilt-trip their targets into giving up their often ludicrous claims of panaceas based on infinitely dilute solutions, candles, stones, touchless massage etc. Of course, if one patient avoids being conned and seeks professional medical help in their time of need rather than turning to quackery and deferring treatments that might save their lives, then they have succeeded.

I’m not against CAM per se, I just want to see the evidence. If it’s science-based, then it’s not alternative, it’s just medicine! Evidence is blinded trials though, not anecdote. Just because you think a particular alt treatment worked is not proof, you may well have got better without it. You can never know for sure, regardless of how convincing the practitioner is nor how convinced you are that conventional medicine is some evil conspiracy in the pocket of big pharma. And, remember you don’t tend to hear the stories from all those people with fatal diseases who turned to alt med and it failed them…often because they’re dead.

But, maybe there is something to be said for the latest alternative practice I heard about just made up, it sounds very sciencey – Remote quantally channelled kinetic agitation.

remote-quacka-ad

First, it’s quantized, derived from quantum, which hooks into a whole lot of New Age stuff about consciousness and borrows heavily from the world of modern physics. Everything is channelled these days too, energy, chi, qi, you name it, it’s channelled, bringing harmony and balance to the mind-body-spirit triumvirate. Best of all, it’s “remote” so treatments can be carried out without the practitioner having to leave the comfort of their luxury yacht and more to the point could even be done over the internet so patient and practitioner needn’t meet and no diseased patient’s grime or sweat need taint the practitioner’s delicate hands.

It’s also kinetic that’s movement and energy and ties in with kinesiology. Agitation – the actual treatment agitating your kinetics quantally, one at a time via the internet.

$120 per hour + taxes. Sounds like a bargain to me, where do you sign up? It’s even got a nice pronounceable name: “Remote QUACKA”.

Asthma, headaches, migraine, ADHD, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, cancer, allergies, hives, acne, back ache, tennis elbow, cruciate ligament problems, mumps, measles, rubella, chicken pox AND shingles, earache, blindness, doublechin, missing limbs, missing brain. A short list of some of the things this and other sCAM practices really, really, really cannot do anything about.

Remote, quantally channelled kinetic agitation is a post from the science blog of David Bradley, author of Deceived Wisdom
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Pro vaccination campaign – Polio

10 February, 2014 - 19:45

There is a lot of #BS talked about the harm vaccines might cause, most of it unproven scaremongering by patient advocates, lawyers, quacks and tabloid journalists. There is almost a religion growing out of the antivax campaign that seems to walk hand-in-hand with conspiracy theory nonsense and the gibberish peddled by those who think governments shouldn’t advise us on what to do when it comes to health, even if it could save lives. Here are a few answers to the antivax brigade.

Pro-vaccination campaign polio

Iron lung photo spotted here - http://www.ebaumsworld.com/pictures/view/83858344/ – 5–10% of patients with paralytic polio die due to the paralysis of muscles used for breathing.

Pro vaccination campaign – Polio is a post from the science blog of David Bradley, author of Deceived Wisdom
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Pro vaccination campaign – Rubella

10 February, 2014 - 19:30

There is a lot of #BS talked about the harm vaccines might cause, most of it unproven scaremongering by patient advocates, lawyers, quacks and tabloid journalists. There is almost a religion growing out of the antivax campaign that seems to walk hand-in-hand with conspiracy theory nonsense and the gibberish peddled by those who think governments shouldn’t advise us on what to do when it comes to health, even if it could save lives. Here are a few answers to the antivax brigade.

Pro vaccination campaign

Baby cataracts from Wiki here – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubella,_congenital – Babies that contract rubella in the womb are at risk of being born deaf (58% of patients), eye abnormalities (43% of patients), congenital heart disease (50% of patients).

Pro vaccination campaign – Rubella is a post from the science blog of David Bradley, author of Deceived Wisdom
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Pro vaccination campaign – Measles

10 February, 2014 - 19:15

There is a lot of #BS talked about the harm vaccines might cause, most of it unproven scaremongering by patient advocates, lawyers, quacks and tabloid journalists. There is almost a religion growing out of the antivax campaign that seems to walk hand-in-hand with conspiracy theory nonsense and the gibberish peddled by those who think governments shouldn’t advise us on what to do when it comes to health, even if it could save lives. Here are a few answers to the antivax brigade.

pro-vaccination-campaign-measles

Child with measles rash – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Measles – Deaths from measles are rare, but complications can occur, bronchitis, fatal panencephalitis, and in immunocompromised patient, mortality is much higher because of pneumonia risk.

Pro vaccination campaign – Measles is a post from the science blog of David Bradley, author of Deceived Wisdom
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Pro vaccination campaign – Mumps

10 February, 2014 - 19:00

There is a lot of #BS talked about the harm vaccines might cause, most of it unproven scaremongering by patient advocates, lawyers, quacks and tabloid journalists. There is almost a religion growing out of the antivax campaign that seems to walk hand-in-hand with conspiracy theory nonsense and the gibberish peddled by those who think governments shouldn’t advise us on what to do when it comes to health, even if it could save lives. Here are a few answers to the antivax brigade.

pro-vaccination-campaign-mumps

Boy with mumps – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mumps – Mumps is rarely lethal but can cause orchitis in adolescent and adult males with a risk of infertility, miscarriage in pregnant women in first trimester (27%), mild meningitis (10% of cases), inflammation of the ovaries in adolescent and adult females with subsequent fertility issues, pancreatitis, encephalitis, deafness. (Yes, I know the boy in the photo isn’t an adolescent).

Pro vaccination campaign – Mumps is a post from the science blog of David Bradley, author of Deceived Wisdom
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Sizing up your carbon footprint

6 February, 2014 - 22:12

Many of us are worried by future climate change, rising sea levels, storms and flooding, hurricanes and soaring temperatures in some parts of the world predicted to occur as atmospheric concentrations of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide continue their upward trend. That trend had its origins in the Industrial Revolution of the nineteenth century Europe and the USA – the “first world” and the rapid development and growth of nations once dubbed “second” (communist states) and “third” world.

Dave Bradley's Muddy Boots

Today, increasing road and air travel, heating and cooling our homes and workplaces and the growing pile of electronic gadgets we recharge daily are all contributing to that well-trodden cliché – our carbon footprint. Those of a guilty disposition often try to “offset” their carbon expenditure by buying into schemes that purportedly negate the impact of the carbon pollution their activities produce. Such schemes commonly involve planting CO2-absorbing trees, but there are many that simply trade carbon pollution allowances and are in some ways worse than the notion of sweeping the problem under the proverbial carpet.

To mix a metaphor, it’s robbing Peter to pay Paul, the classic double accounting used by multinational corporations who somehow trim the fat away from their tax bills by charging out their services to subsidiary companies so that their profit line is rendered negligible. Offsetting carbon, however it is done, might appear superficially to be a promising way to tackle the problem of carbon emissions, but it’s environmental double accounting: in this sense the bottom line is not a reduction of carbon emissions and so no environmental impact, rather a shuffling of paper and an offsetting of the moral obligation and the guilt associated with energy use and mass consumerism.

Larita Killian of Indiana University at Columbus, USA, might agree. She has taken an accountancy approach to the ethics of carbon offsetting and reports details in the International Journal of Critical Accounting this month. Killian reveals that while it might appear to be the ethical choice if one must take international flights, drive luxury cars, or consume exotic, non-local food and drink. But, the physical activities involved in offsetting or searching for alternative energy sources involve carbon emissions of their own.

Killian suggests that the whole offsetting industry moves the onus from the providers to the consumers and may well lull individuals into a false sense of security regarding the impact of their activities on the environment without pushing governments and corporate bodies to carry out truly effective measures such as efficiency drives on a massive scale and an enforced reduction of power consumption, the main drives for carbon emissions. She adds that, “The remedy is not to eliminate personal carbon offset accounting, but to augment voluntary offsets with more effective measures such as carbon taxes, formal restrictions on emissions of greenhouse gases, and investments in renewable energy.” Of course, that also assumes the renewable energy sources are wholly sustainable and do not in themselves generate greater emissions in their manufacture, installation, servicing, and decommissioning nor impact on ecosystems to such a degree that their benefits are outstripped by environmental harm.

Research Blogging IconKillian L. (2013). The rhetoric of personal carbon offset accounting, International Journal of Critical Accounting, 5 (6) 663. DOI:

Sizing up your carbon footprint is a post from the science blog of David Bradley, author of Deceived Wisdom
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Creationists, evolution is not confusing

6 February, 2014 - 10:24

The infamous “March of Progress” diagram is not a scientific illustration of human evolution, although creationists haul it out repeatedly as some kind of evidence that evolution is wrong. They usually tell their flock that there are millions of “chimps” and millions of people, and ask: “Where are the millions of in-between species?”. Trouble is, there is no “chimp” in the diagram, the creature depicted on the left represents an ancient, long-extinct human ancestor, as do all the species in between, from which modern humans evolved. That’s the basic flaw in the creationist’s critique.

march-of-progressMore important than their delusion about the “chimp”, is that no scientist takes this diagram seriously anyway, and never did. Evolution is not a march of progress from an inferior species to a superior one. Evolution is simply about animals surviving to reproductive age and producing offspring fit for any changes in environmental conditions. All of your ancestors had at least offspring that surivived and had its own.

Rudolph Zellinger who painted the picture to illustrate anthropologist F. Clark Howell’s 1965 book Early Man apparently never intended the diagram to be taken to show a linear progression, although of course, that is how it appears and how many people have take it in countless pastiches since.

Human evolution is the result of many a convoluted turn over millions of years illustrated in this “family tree” which shows the common ancestor, a forest ape, from which several species, chimps, modern humans and gorillas, ultimately evolved. There are numerous dead-ends, but there is a direct line back from today’s apes (including ourselves) to that common ancestor 8 million years ago.

Creationists, evolution is not confusing is a post from the science blog of David Bradley, author of Deceived Wisdom
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This year’s bright young thing

4 February, 2014 - 12:23

You will have seen the news recently that a new supernova has appeared in the sky. This one is quite close, a mere 12- million light years (more than 1020 kilometres from Earth. I reported on it at the time for SpectroscopyNOW

SN2014J-supernova

“Astronomers have planned observations using the Hubble Space Telescope operated by NASA and the European Space Agency as well as NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, and Swift missions in order to glean as much information about the recent supernova flare-up SN 2014J, in galaxy M82 as possible.”

I now have some additional thoughts from team leader Steve Fossey of the UCL group that first spotted this object in the night sky while simply doing a telescope student workshop because it was a cloudy night. I asked him what’s next:

“Results from the AAVSO website indicate it has peaked and is starting to fade. Typical fade rates for these objects are about a factor 2.5 every fortnight. While this requires urgent observations now, this actually means that we will be studying this object for a long time to come, and it will remain visible in amateur and small-telescope imaging for many weeks for sure. Professional facilities will follow it for months (and it is well placed in the sky to do so),” he told me.

He points out that there is an urgent need to observe the development and evolution of the SN as the shock wave and radiation field interact with the surrounding circumstellar medium. “One critical matter is the question of when ‘first light’ occurred, as this helps to constrain the size of the supernova progenitor – we expect a degenerate star such as a white dwarf, but of course this can never be directly observed (unless it were so close that this would be apparent in pre-SN imaging – but not in this case). The early light-curve shape also helps to investigate the nature of the expanding fireball – there is a paper just out on arxiv (Zheng et al., 2014, http://arxiv.org/abs/1401.7968) in which so-called “prediscovery” data have been used to pin down the time of first light – and it implies a very rapid early rise in brightness, much faster than simple scaling arguments for the brightness of the expanding fireball imply. This is not well understood (see Zheng et al.)”

Fossey suggests that searches for evidence for the putative companion will be sought through pre-explosion imaging data, such as in archival Hubble Space Telescope images. He adds that, “The Swift UV and X-ray observations are crucial also for detecting the impact of the explosion on the putative companion star, and on the surrounding interstellar and circumstellar medium (CSM); the CSM is especially important, since an X-ray detection or limit can be related to the nature of the putative companion – whether a giant star, solar-type star, etc. – since those objects can be expected to have blown material into the CSM over their lifetimes. If no detections are made (and as your piece notes, there has never been an X-ray detection for any previous type Ia SNe), the detection limits may provide evidence for a double-degenerate scenario where two white dwarfs have merged. It all depends on how tight those limits (or detections) are.”

“UV spectroscopy from Hubble will also help to prove the elemental composition of the fireball as it expands and becomes more transparent, allowing us to see `deeper’ and understand something of the fusion processes which took place when the progenitor detonated,” he told me. “And gamma-ray observations will help constrain the amount and distribution of nickel-56 in the ejecta, which will help us understand the nature of the WD structure and detonation mechanisms. It’s all very exciting!”

This year’s bright young thing is a post from the science blog of David Bradley, author of Deceived Wisdom
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Weights and measures

3 February, 2014 - 09:37

UPDATE: Now, there’s a coincidence, it’s just been announced that NPL has been officially deemed the birthplace of atomic timekeeping by the European Physical Society, EPS.

Sciencebase reader Clayton W from Canada was keen to find some obtain up-to-date and accurate physical and chemical constants that wasn’t just the US NIST page. He is currently tutoring some high school and higher chemistry and physics students, and wanted access to better resources than the data tables provided.

First acronyms that came to mind were NPL, ISO, SI, IUPAC and IUPAP

  • National Physical Laboratory, NPL
  • International Standards Organisation, ISO, or these days International Organization for Standardization*
  • Systeme Internationale, SI, Bureau International de Poids et Measures, BIPM
  • International Union of Pure & Applied Chemistry, IUPAC, see also Gold Book.
  • International Union of Pure & Applied Physics, IUPAP

chilli-scales

Then, there’s the Merck Index, now operated by my alma mater Royal Society of Chemistry, which was always a useful resource for finding named reactions (Dies-Alder, Heck etc etc) and common abbreviations, chemical structures, constants and conversions. I have a Tenth Edition print copy of the Merck Index from 1983 on my desk, which originally belonged to former RSC editor extraordinaire, the late Eddie Smith and was handed on at some point in the distant past. There’s also the so-called Rubber Handbook, which isn’t what you might think, rather it’s the century-old CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics.

*Wouldn’t that be iOS?

Weights and measures is a post from the science blog of David Bradley, author of Deceived Wisdom
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Country Roads – a short, short story

1 February, 2014 - 11:28

Countless psychology theses have been written about creativity under pressure, deadlines pushing people to new heights, the fight or flight adrenalin panic that opens the floodgates for a stream of consciousness to come gushing out. Obvious it seems that after a momentary panic revolving around a dark and wet night, one’s teenage son, the police and a third-party apparently moving too fast in their car that panic kicks in. Everything else is put on hold until teenage son arrives home with not a scratch on him nor the car, but the adrenalin still needs to be burn out. And, so, the writer writes:

country-road-short-storyCountry Roads – a very short story by David Bradley.

Country Roads – a short, short story is a post from the science blog of David Bradley, author of Deceived Wisdom
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Fat versus sugar

31 January, 2014 - 16:08

If you haven’t got an hour to spare to watch the recent BBC Horizon program about fat and sugar diets, then here’s an executive summary of Colin’s Beauty Page’s executive summary of the main conclusions:

Extreme diets are a bad move…we can survive for a while without sugar and carbohydrates and can function pretty well on nothing but carbs. We struggle to cope with the sheer pleasure of the combination of fat and sugar…but a little indulgence does little harm. Excess calories (from fat and sugar) lead to weight gain.

The bottom line, boring advice is: Don’t do extreme diets. Just don’t eat too much of anything delicious that is loaded with calories.

I’d add: do some exercise, get some sunshine and fresh air and laugh a lot, have lots of friends and sing!

Fat versus Sugar – Horizon BBC2 |Colin's Beauty Pages.

Fat versus sugar is a post from the science blog of David Bradley, author of Deceived Wisdom
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The song of M62

29 January, 2014 - 20:19

Cosmology can often put our small-scale problems into some kind of perspective

M62-perspective

The song of M62 is a post from the science blog of David Bradley, author of Deceived Wisdom
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Ancient alternative quackery

28 January, 2014 - 10:05

From an interview with science-based science writer and oncologist David Gorski:

david-gorski

Many discussions of alternative medicine reference the fact that it is “natural” and relies on methods used throughout history. Is this true; how did the initial ideas about alternative medicine originate?

This is called an appeal to antiquity, the argument that just because a treatment is old there must be something to it; it must work. It’s such a common argument that skeptics consider it a fallacy, at least in science and medicine. In any case, most of the ideas about alternative medicine have their roots in prescientific ideas, such as vitalism (the idea of a “life force”) and other forms of magical thinking. Alternative medicine also flourishes because humans are pattern-forming animals. We confuse correlation with causation all the time, and are unaware of placebo effects, which leads us to conclude that various remedies work when they don’t.

via The flaws of alternative medicine — ROOSTERGNN.

Gorski portrait by BDEngler

Ancient alternative quackery is a post from the science blog of David Bradley, author of Deceived Wisdom
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All-natural human ingredients

27 January, 2014 - 12:47

UPDATE: It doesn’t really affect the ingredients list, but our body mass also comprises 1-3% bacteria, but they’re just proteins, fats, sugars, minerals and much of the other stuff I listed below anyway ;-)

Recently, a clever wag listed the ingredients for all-natural bananas, blueberries and eggs, you’ll have no doubt seen the cute graphics that did the rounds of the blogosphere. Anyway, obvious next step was to list the human body by ingredient, I suspect someone else may well have done this before (certainly there are star-stuff elemental breakdowns, but ingredients lists are usually at the molecular, as opposed to the atomic, level. So here’s my take, one for wannabe Hannibal Lecters:

all-natural-human-ingredients

The recent idea – egg, banana, blueberries – was featured on io9 and elsewhere.

As Laura Merritt pointed out to me on Twitter, Hannibal should also take note that brains are very high fat…maybe I should do an organ by organ breakdown of the protein, fat, sugar content. She also points out that very few of us are “free range” these days, what with all the titanium hip replacements, silicone implants, mercury amalgam dental fillings etc…lots of additives.

All-natural human ingredients is a post from the science blog of David Bradley, author of Deceived Wisdom
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Very, very, very grey is the new black

27 January, 2014 - 10:59

Mathematician Stephen Hawking who has long argued the ins and outs of black holes now reasons that they don’t even exist, at least not in the form we imagine. The whole idea of an event horizon beyond which the singularity’s massive gravitational field will not allow anything to escape, not even light, is a theoretical construct that cannot persist once quantum mechanics is taken into account, apparently. In other words, very, very, very grey is the new black.

black-holes-dont-exist

More…

Very, very, very grey is the new black is a post from the science blog of David Bradley, author of Deceived Wisdom
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Temperature of a liquid is raised by heating

25 January, 2014 - 22:12

This is not some incredible scientific breakthrough, obviously…the temperature of a liquid is raised by heating…yes indeed. Sciencebase gets a lot of visitors trying to do their science homework, it seems. Often they’re trying to find out the effects of adding salt to the boiling point of water, that kind of thing.

latent-heat-is-on

Today, one person (don’t know if they’re a student or not) just hit the site with this phrase: “the temperature of a liquid is raised by heating”. They’re right, of course. Although there is a caveat. If you boil a liquid or melt a solid then there is the issue of latent heat.

Latent heat is the energy released or absorbed by a body or a thermodynamic system during a constant-temperature process (i.e. it doesn’t get hotter). A typical example is a change of state of matter, meaning a phase transition such as the melting of ice or the boiling of water. Scottish chemist Joseph Black coined the term in the 18th Century and used it in the context of calorimetry when referring to the heat transferred that caused a change of volume while the thermodynamic system was held at constant temperature.

The counterpart to latent heat, which we usually just think of as heat is an energy referred to as sensible energy or heat which does cause processes to change the temperature of a system.

Temperature of a liquid is raised by heating is a post from the science blog of David Bradley, author of Deceived Wisdom
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WebElements: the periodic table on the WWW [http://www.webelements.com/]

Copyright 1993-2011 Mark Winter [The University of Sheffield and WebElements Ltd, UK]. All rights reserved.