Chemistry Nexus

by WebElements: the periodic table on the web

International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) have confirmed the names of elements 113, 115, 117, and 118 as:

  • Nihonium and symbol Nh, for element 113
  • Moscovium and symbol Mc, for element 115
  • Tennessine and symbol Ts, for element 117
  • Oganesson and symbol Og, for element 118

This followed a 5-month period of public review after which the names earlier proposed by the discoverers were approved by IUPAC.

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November 30th, 2016

Posted In: Periodic table, Chemical education, Radioactive elements

A huge find of #helium gas in Tanzania may alleviate critical helium gas resources for some time. Helium is required for cooling NMR magnets and associated imaging instruments in medicine (MRI)

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June 28th, 2016

Posted In: Atmospheric chemistry, Geological chemistry, Group 18 elements

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Wondering why the most expensive diamond ever (the Oppenheimer Blue, £35 million) is blue – it is because of boron impurities, element 5 in the periodic table.

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May 19th, 2016

Posted In: Chemistry

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A panel commentary in Nature Chemistry Commentary speculates upon the names that might be proposed for the four new elements in the periodic table. Worth a read, but we’ll have to wait a while longer yet.

Abstract: “Of all the things humans can bestow names upon, new chemical elements are about the rarest. Our group of periodic table experts attempts to read the tea leaves and predict the names for elements 113, 115, 117 and 118.”

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March 23rd, 2016

Posted In: Periodic table, Nuclear chemistry, Radioactive elements

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The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) has provisional recommendations for the naming of new elements and the recommendations are open for comment until 29 February 2016.

IUPAC state “the most important change is that the names of all new elements should have an ending that reflects and maintains historical and chemical consistency. This would be in general “-ium” for elements belonging to groups 1-16, “-ine” for elements of group 17 and “-on” for elements of group 18.”

The discoverers have the right to suggest names and symbols.

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February 24th, 2016

Posted In: Chemistry

The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) announced IN January 2016 that the identification of the four new elements with atomic numbers 113, 115, 117, and 118 is verified and that the discoverers of elements 113, 115, 117, and 118 are invited to suggest names.

Element 113 has a temporary working (systematic) name and symbol: ununtrium, Uut. It was discovered by the RIKEN collaboration team in Japan who fulfilled the criteria for element Z=113.

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February 24th, 2016

Posted In: Nuclear chemistry, Radioactive elements

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The media cover a story that scientists at the German Max Planck Institute produced a helium plasma contained for about a tenth of a second but at about 1000000 K. The next step at the Wendelstein 7-X (a stellarator fusion reactor) is to increase the stability of the plasma, to improve the heating method, and to increase the plasma temperature.

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December 20th, 2015

Posted In: Nuclear chemistry

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Can you make your name, or any other word(s) come to that, from element symbols? Find out using this MyFunStudio script.

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December 10th, 2015

Posted In: Chemistry, Periodic table

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Well it’s Christmas so here are a few Christmasy chemistry links:

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December 10th, 2015

Posted In: Chemistry

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For those of you with access to Channel 4 in the UK, here is information about the The Royal Institution (RI) Christmas Lectures. See here for details of the 2015 lectures: how to survive in space.

Dr Kevin Fong opens a window onto today’s most exciting space missions, explores the future of space travel, and offers a unique insight into the challenges of protecting human life in the hostile environment of space in the 2015 Christmas lectures.

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December 10th, 2015

Posted In: Chemistry, Chemical education, Environmental chemistry

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