Reactivity

Can someone plz tell me why sulfur is sometimes found as a free element on the earth but bromine is not?
This may be easy for some of u but plz explain :oops:
THx

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Re: Reactivity

[quote="Minny"]Can someone plz tell me why sulfur is sometimes found as a free element on the earth but bromine is not?
This may be easy for some of u but plz explain :oops:
THx[/quote]

Sulfur is sometimes found as a free element due to how sulfur forms a relatively stable ring structure which gives it some stability. (Sulfur actually exists as an octoatomic moleucle of S8.) Since this ring structure gives it a decent amount of chemical stability, it is able to concentrate and be found as a free element in certain parts of the world.

Bromine, however, is never found free in nature. As a halogen, it is one electron short of having a complete set of electrons. It desperately wants to be like Krypton and have a full set, so it will readily react with just about everything in order to get that electron and form the bromide ion. Because of this, you cannot find it free in nature. You have to make it from it's "ore."

[quote](Sulfur actually exists as an octoatomic moleucle of S8.)

wow thx.
but i don't get the S8 bit. :?:

Oxygen eists in nature as O2. Sulfur as S8.

WoW realli?
cool

But if it is found as a octoatomic then why is it in group six?
:roll:

[quote="Minny"]
If it is found as a octoatomic then why is it in group six?
:roll:[/quote]
At first, sulfur is in the 16th group. You have maybe meant it has 6 valentic electons. The number of valentic electrons is not related with the number of atoms in each molecule. For example O2, S8 and Po (which is metal and doesn`t make molecules) are in the same group.

Oh i c. :o
Ok one more question:
What is the chemical reactions for the extraction of the copper metal. (chalcopyrite)
can anyone tell me plz plz.

Reaction when chalcopyrite is roasted (heated with oxygen):

2 CuFeS2 --> Cu2S + 2 FeS + SO2

Cu2S + O2(g) --> Cu2O + SO2(g)

Cu2S + Cu2O --> Cu + SO2(g)

Re: Reactivity

[quote="Jdurg"][quote="Minny"]Can someone plz tell me why sulfur is sometimes found as a free element on the earth but bromine is not?
This may be easy for some of u but plz explain :oops:
THx[/quote]

Sulfur is sometimes found as a free element due to how sulfur forms a relatively stable ring structure which gives it some stability. (Sulfur actually exists as an octoatomic moleucle of S8.) Since this ring structure gives it a decent amount of chemical stability, it is able to concentrate and be found as a free element in certain parts of the world.

Bromine, however, is never found free in nature. As a halogen, it is one electron short of having a complete set of electrons. It desperately wants to be like Krypton and have a full set, so it will readily react with just about everything in order to get that electron and form the bromide ion. Because of this, you cannot find it free in nature. You have to make it from it's "ore."[/quote]

Nice explanation

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Sulfur electron configuration order: 1s-2s-2p-3s-3p-3d-4s-4p-4d-4f-5s-5p-5d-5f-6s-6p-6d-7s

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