Activity series and net ionic equation

i cant seem to get these to work out;
[b]For each of the following identify those for which a reaction is likely to occur. For those that do occur, write the net ionic equation.[/b]

a) chromium dipped into silver nitrate.
b) gold immersed in hydrochloric acid.
c) nickel pellets dropped into calcium acetate, Ca(C2H302)2
d) Aluminum dropped into a bath of sulphuric acid.
e) Zinc dipped into a solution of lead (II) nitrate.

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Thats It

nickel pellets dropped into calcium acetate, Ca(C2H302)2

Look,
metals wanna shed their valence electrons.

The more vicious and fizzy the metal, the more it wants rid of them.

Nice noble gentell metals are nowhere near as pushy.

So, you can arrange metals in an "activity" series from BLOODY MENTALLY FIXATED ON SHEDDING ELECTRONS right down to SO NOBLE THEY HAVE BETTER THINGS DO TO.

If you put a pair of metals together in one place,
they will fight so that the fizzier throws its electrons away, becoming a cation, and the other metal has to pick them up.

For each of your questions, (a) to (e),
look and see what the two "metals" are (hint: hydrogen counts as a "metal" in this scenario)
and see which one is keenest to shed electrons.

Perhaps the strongest one already HAS shed 'em and become a cation, in which case nothing further will happen.
Otherwise, the stronger one with become a cation, and the poor weakling metal will be "reduced" to picking up the shed electrons and losing its cation-ness.

I hope you don't swear at your tutorial students!

Bloody is so archaic that it is no more swearing than zounds is.

However, I prefer to think that electropositive metals like aluminum are generous with their electrons, sharing them with beggarly types (perhaps this view has something to do with my patron saint) while things like Au are niggardly; not doubt this explains the associations between money and damnation.

:)

My last tutorial student used to smoke in lessons!

[quote="Martin17"]Bloody is so archaic that it is no more swearing than zounds is.

However, I prefer to think that electropositive metals like aluminum are generous with their electrons, sharing them with beggarly types (perhaps this view has something to do with my patron saint) while things like Au are niggardly; not doubt this explains the associations between money and damnation.

:)[/quote]
My nan would not be best pleased if I said Bloody in front of her. Same with crap.

Bloody is very British. Makes me sound so much more posh when I say it.
8)

you can always say "bally" or "bleddy" instead :lol:

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