Help with Oxygen! please read, :)

i have the following questionss:

as med student i had to read biochemestry while i was on 2nd grade...anyway, i read several times in different books that the equations for the oxidative phosphorilation were as follow (regarding the oxygen of course)

1/2 O2 + 2H+ (among other things) = H2O
or 1/2 O2 + H2 = H20 <-- though i dont know if this equation is correct

now, onto the questions:

1) why 1/2 O2? why not simple O? i know that the oxygen is found in its molecular state in nature, but, that leads me to the other question:

2) i havent seen in any biochem book the proportion that it should really be, chemistrically speaking: 2H2 + O2 = H2O, why is that? - lets asumme that actually the final reaction only gives one water molecule (within the body), and then again, that leads me to the next question:

3) if its always used 1/2 O2 + 2H+, what happens to the other oxygen atom? as i recall, oxygen has a covalent bond, thus, it would need a lot of energy to break it or so i think, any thoughts?

i know this is a chemistry forum, but i think somebody can help me with this, thanks, :)

by the way, main question...why 1/2 O2 ?!?!, hehe

thankss
rick hunter

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8) bien, una parte de la repuesta que buscas, es que 1/2 O2, no se refiere a la mol

Yoy are thinking about (1/2) as have a molecule. It is beeter to think about it as half a mole.

gracias x la respuesta rolando,
also, thanks for your answer and help UCB Mitch dude :)

oye rolando, una pregunta, el uso de moles aplica para reacciones redox?

es que, checando mas a fondo las figuras y la reacciones de la fosforilacion oxidativa, la formula que usan es [b]1/2 O2 + 2H+ -> H2O[/b], es decir, segun yo (creoo, pero me gustaria ver si se puede corroborar e inclusive contradecir para dar con la verdad) estan hablando de protones y electrones, puesto que esto es la finalidad de la fos. oxidativa. lo que quiero decir finalmente, es que pienso que dicen 1/2 O2 refiriendose a un par de electrones desapareados, suponiendo 1 atomo de oxigeno (o 1/2 O2 en este caso) y la union de 2 protones (2H+).

si puedo, voy a scanear o a ver como pongo las reacciones junto con el nad+ o nadh por que curiosmente, la maldita estequiometria y balanceo no dan!, jeje. voy a copiar las formulas luego, son pocas. thankss

is that spanish?

yeaa, its spanishh
by the way, the thankss and the last question in spanish was for renny...i dunno why the hell i read rolando...man!, was i sleeping (or watching soccer for that matter) or what?

yeaa, its spanishh
by the way, the thankss and the last question in spanish was for renny...i dunno why the hell i read rolando...man!, was i sleeping (or watching soccer for that matter) or what?

geez...i must be still falling asleep or something... i better read everything in the reply windows before answering something..., hehe, i just saw your nick and your name...thats what night shifts usually do to somebody...

[quote]Yoy are thinking about (1/2) as have a molecule. It is beeter to think about it as half a mole.[/quote]

i think its better that way, i agree with that, just another question UCB Mitch:

what would be the purpose of writing it that way?

why not making a balance of the reaction?

thankss again

I've noticed with chemical notation a rulled called, "the rule of laziness". It's just easier to only have to add one coefficient in front of oxygen than to write coefficients for two other molecules.

Re: Help with Oxygen! please read, :)

[quote="RickHunter"]
2) i havent seen in any biochem book the proportion that it should really be, chemistrically speaking: 2H2 + O2 = H2O, why is that? - lets asumme that actually the final reaction only gives one water molecule (within the body), and then again, that leads me to the next question:

Hi there...I'm in 9th grade and I'm studying this
2H2 = O2=H2O formula too
I dont really understand when my teacher taught it could anyone help me in English?
And Rick...if I can get some time from my teacher to explain to me the formula I'll post here again...

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