octet rule....

which atoms do not obey the octet rule?

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H, He and anything past (not including) Ar

but.....

but then how can there be molecules such as PCL5 or ion
PO3 -4 and I belive there are others... (p has more then 8 electrons!)

by the way you sound like you know what you are talking about :wink: so if you know anything about H-NMR and can help on the subject, check out my message on it...

Because atoms don't care about the silly "rules" we humans have made to describe, however untidy we may find it.

Where there's orbitals, there's a way, or sthg.

Re: but.....

[quote="sshiber"]but then how can there be molecules such as PCL5 or ion
PO3 -4 and I belive there are others... (p has more then 8 electrons!)

by the way you sound like you know what you are talking about :wink: so if you know anything about H-NMR and can help on the subject, check out my message on it...[/quote]
Ahhh, molecule wise (I wasn't thinking there; thought it was a silly question)

Anything that has 'low lying d orbitals', according to one theory. pd mixing. So a lot of the second row (third period) are likely to break the rule, but it's only a wishy washy thing.

P, S, Si too, I think.

to feline1....

[quote="feline1"]Because atoms don't care about the silly "rules" we humans have made to describe, however untidy we may find it.

Where there's orbitals, there's a way, or sthg.[/quote]

ok just so you know I have heard people died from cynicism :!: ...

yeah but considerably MORE people die each year from naïvety... :P

mmm....

got me there....
well..untill next time.. :wink:

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