should be a easy question (please answer)

I'm doing research on the element called carbon.

But I can't find out who discovered carbon and in what year.

EDIT: I also need to find the cost of the element and where did the name come from.

Thanks to the person who answer my first question

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Carbon discovery

Carbon is from latin carbo, carbonis 'a coal, charcoal'; fairly pure carbon is produced by the destructive distilation of wood (charcoal) and was observed by ancient humans before recorded history. Similarly, sulfur occurs in natural deposits around volcanic vents and was observed in the most ancient times.

If I recall coorectly, it was Lavoisier who burned a diamond and demonstrated that the resulting gas (CO2) was identical to burned charcoal and that diamond must also be a form of carbon. Diamonds were similarly observed from the earliest times.

hehe, your great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-grandparents discovered it. :)

Re: Carbon discovery

[quote="Martin17"]Carbon is from latin carbo, carbonis 'a coal, charcoal'; fairly pure carbon is produced by the destructive distilation of wood (charcoal) and was observed by ancient humans before recorded history. Similarly, sulfur occurs in natural deposits around volcanic vents and was observed in the most ancient times.

If I recall coorectly, it was Lavoisier who burned a diamond and demonstrated that the resulting gas (CO2) was identical to burned charcoal and that diamond must also be a form of carbon. Diamonds were similarly observed from the earliest times.[/quote]

ur too detailed for me(too smart for me)

can u just say the two things i asked for?

lol, wow that was surprising. I'll translate for you.

It has been around so long that no one can remember who first discovered it. The year of its discovery is prehistoric. Meaning records weren't kept back then since there was no written language at the time.

[quote="UCB Mitch"]lol, wow that was surprising. I'll translate for you.

It has been around so long that no one can remember who first discovered it. The year of its discovery is prehistoric. Meaning records weren't kept back then since there was no written language at the time.[/quote]

I know that i just want the answer to be right for certain

if you're too lazy to explain just post a website link if you want?

Don't know of any website pertaining to the fact that Carbon was discovered prehistorically. It should be obvious enough.

there is a brief-brief histroy of carbon on this site. If you looked.

I checked this site already
its like what you said (brief)

someone can delete this now
(spent almost half an hour looking for it, mostly cause some websites were lieing)

Re: Carbon discovery

[quote="Martin17"]Carbon is from latin carbo, carbonis 'a coal, charcoal'; fairly pure carbon is produced by the destructive distilation of wood (charcoal) and was observed by ancient humans before recorded history. Similarly, sulfur occurs in natural deposits around volcanic vents and was observed in the most ancient times.

If I recall coorectly, it was Lavoisier who burned a diamond and demonstrated that the resulting gas (CO2) was identical to burned charcoal and that diamond must also be a form of carbon. Diamonds were similarly observed from the earliest times.[/quote]

Thanks for that information
This topic can be deleted now

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