The fifth state of matter- what is it?

I know that there is four states of matter: Solid, liquid, gas, plasma. But i heard that there is a fifth that is called "Superatom" that is created when it is really cold. Can anyone please give me some extra information? Thanks!

Tags:

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

This state of matter is well

This state of matter is well known now , it is called "bose-einstein condensate".
Mr cohen tanoudji got the nobel prize for develloping it.
It has numerous applications right now such as :

-Atomic laser (still in research time)

-Ultra precise time measurement.

-ultracold chemistry

- Several quantum observations on a giant scale .

and many others

surely "plasma" is a state of matter too -
in fact about 99% of matter in the universe looks like its in plasma state!

Fifth state

Could it be a supercritical fluid?

Do all elements go through this state?

Re: The fifth state of matter- what is it?

[quote="scottyiu"]I know that there is four states of matter: Solid, liquid, gas, plasma. But i heard that there is a fifth that is called "Superatom" that is created when it is really cold. Can anyone please give me some extra information? Thanks![/quote]

In a physics book from Gerthsen and Meschede: "Physik" (Springer), there are listed about 9 states of matter. I can't remember what it was exactly, but it ended with "neutron stars" and "black holes"...?

But there was nothing "colder" than solid, liquid or ordinary gaseous state of matter. the pressure and density of black holes is given as 10[sup]27[/sup] bar and 10[sup]17[/sup] kg/m[sup]3[/sup], respectively...(ouch).

oh come on, you don't believe in that whole "black holes" nonsense, do you...?

they do exist though, don't they...?

no

My astrophysics friend says they do!

They get paid hundreds of thousands of dollars in research grants to say that... :roll:

Seen much phlogisten in the labs recently...?

WebElements: the periodic table on the WWW [http://www.webelements.com/]

Copyright 1993-20010 Mark Winter [The University of Sheffield and WebElements Ltd, UK]. All rights reserved.