Pop Can Lab

Can someone please help me with this chemistry lab that we have been working on in school. Here's my lab write up:

Title: Pop Can Lab

Purpose: To use gas laws to explain the observed reactions

Hypothesis: N/A

Procedure:
1. Set an ice water bath using the tray provided
2. Put 15-25 milliliters of H[sub]2[/sub]O in a clean aluminum can.
3. On a hot plate, heat the water in the can to boiling.
4. After the water has boiled for 2 minutes, using lab tongs, quicklyinvert and insert the can into the ice bath, After several seconds, lift can out.
5. Record the observations.

Data: Observations?
I need help with the observations!

The observations i observed were: The can sucked water into it. Why is this? It made a loud crunching sound,
How did the volume change?
How did the Temperature change?
How did the Pressure change?

Conclusion: In a paragraph describe what happened to the can in terms of gas concepts and laws (Temperature, Pressure, Volume, Constaants.)

If someone would please take a minute of their time to please help. I would be extremely grateful.
:D :!: :?:

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First: change your nickname

Second: don't post the same question two forums

Third: according to pV=nRT when the Temperature goes down, the pressure goes down and so it sucks air into it. With water the effect is much stronger because water is no ideal gas and becomes liquid producing a bigger non-linear pressure decrease.

Ok

Thankyou alot Felixe that helped alot! If anybody else has any more information on this could you please post it?
Thanks a million!
Oh and how do you change your username?

you're welcome

I don't think you can change your nickname. What I was just trying to say is that I think yours is pretty offensive.

Joke

It was a joke you dont have to take things so offensively!
lol

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