Does HYDROGEN belong to any group?

My chemistry teacher told me that hydrogen does not belong to any group...
But the periodic table tell me that hydrogen belongs to Gp. I! :?:
confused...

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What you have to understand is that groups are just made up by humans, to help us organise our knowledge.

Atoms couldn't care less about them :lol:

Hydrogen isn't very easy to classify into a group -
groups are collections of elements with similar chemistry, which display a nice trend in properties.

Hydrogen doesn't really have the same properties or behaviour as any other element,
so no, it doesn't really make much sense to say it belongs to any group.

However if you are drawing a periodic table, you have to put it somewhere!
So they often put it above group 1 (cos at least it does have a valency of 1)

Or sometimes above group 17.

Or sometimes just floating around above the d block!

Re: Does HYDROGEN belong to any group?

[quote="ratta"]My chemistry teacher told me that hydrogen does not belong to any group...
But the periodic table tell me that hydrogen belongs to Gp. I! :?:
confused...[/quote]

There is more than one way to classify the elements in a periodic table, many in fact. If we like an electronic classification then H goes well with Li etc as all have s[sup]1[/sup] configurations (but H is not a metal of course). Or we can put it in Group 17 as these elements all form an anion X[sup]-[/sup] with the config of the next noble gas. Or we can decide it is unique and let it hang rather uneasily over the top of the table somewhere.

The thing to know is the basis upon which it is classified the way it is in any particular version, and to be relaxed about the notion that we can just as easily put it somewhere else if it suits for a particular purpose.[/sup]

If you get it cold enough and put enough pressure on it, hydrogen becomes metallic; a mass of metallic hydrogen is thought to be at the core of Jupiter, though I've never been there myself.

Thanks for answering my question :P

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