Water

Are their objects that have a greater density than water and still float on water??? Also my friend is a fag and says that planes should technically not fly and that because of gravity they should fall and that their is no proven fact that says planes should fly... i researched it and i've found lots but could u guys just say that it should pllz

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a witch!

I suggest you watch the film "Monty Python and the Holy Grail"

It is *almost* as hilarious as your post,
and you'll find it most informative regarding what floats in water.

:? mhmmmm well why don't u just answer my question, i swear to god that objects that are more dense than water can float... i read about it in a different post that i can't find... i just wanna kno which objects would float.

The whole physics behind whether something can float or not is its average density in relation to the medium in which it exists. Meaning: A ship made of steel is technically more dense than water, but the interior of the ship in which the air is present contributes as the average density of the area submersed, and therefore overall, that average density is less than water, and it floats. If you have a cup, take the mass of the cup, mass of the air inside the cup, and divide it by the total volume of the cup-material + area inside the cup, and that AVERAGE density (if the cup isn't lead or bismuth, haha) will be less than water, and it will float. But if you have a solid piece of something, without air pockets or so on, that is more dense inherently than water, IT CANNOT FLOAT! The only way it will stay on top of the water is if you FREEZE THE WATER! Otherwise, it's sinking. Anyone who tells you otherwise is just an idiot.

Speaking of idiots, who told you "planes shouldn't be able to fly"? Have either of you gone to a SINGLE physics class? The force of gravity is overcome (multiple times, in fact) by the lift provided by the wings. High pressure below the wings and low pressure on top of the wings pushes the unit upwards in relation to how fast something is moving. At over 400mph, there is a hell of a lot of lift, and it's not too hard to get a hollow aluminum tube to get off the ground. Please don't do the ignorant thing and just say "It's impossible, so God/Vishnu/Allah/whoever did it!". It's not impossible, it just doesn't make sense to someone who doesn't know about physics and fluid dynamics. So go to class, learn exactly why planes have been flying successfully for over a hundred years, and give your friend a quick kick to the shins for telling you planes shouldn't be able to fly.

water boatmen

Thugz, maybe you should spend less time working on yo fag friend's booty ass,
that would be my advice...

Or alternatively you might like not to use pejorative homophobic jibes in your posts.

After that, I really would advise you watch Monty Python, it's full of fags.
And then go visit a pond.
Pond-life could teach you a lot...

Re: water boatmen

[quote="feline1"]Thugz, maybe you should spend less time working on yo fag friend's booty ass,
that would be my advice...

Or alternatively you might like not to use pejorative homophobic jibes in your posts.

After that, I really would advise you watch Monty Python, it's full of fags.
And then go visit a pond.
Pond-life could teach you a lot...[/quote]
HAHAHAHAHAHA Your such a joker lmfao omfg hahahahaha so funny... seriously

You think I'm joking?

Water boatmen...
small leaves.....
pond skaters......

[quote="feline1"]You think I'm joking?

Water boatmen...
small leaves.....
pond skaters......[/quote] lmfao doesn't matter what you said it just is funny. obviously idc wtf u say ... You think I'm joking?<< dude it sthe internet chill wit the grammar

ohh, ohh....this is like the *only* monty python thing I have ever seen.

Ducks float on water
So if a person weight the same as a duck, she must be a WITCH!!11111 then, yes?

BURN HER!!!!!!!!!!

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