Fluorine Project!! :-D

[color=purple] Hi everyone! I just joined this site after finding information on fluorine for a science project. It seems really interesting, especially since I don't usually apprciate science. I just started this thread to talk about fluorine, so maybe I can get some help on finding 2 more interesting facts about this element. Thanks everyone.[/color]

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Fluorine is an extremely

Fluorine is an extremely reactive and highly toxic gaseous element. In very small amounts, it is also a trace element necessary for the health of most organisms, although the line between enough and too much is very fine. Pure fluorine is a pale yellow, highly corrosive, poisonous gas. It allegedly has a very pungent odor, although since inhalation of the gas is extremely dangerous, this is difficult to verify. It is essentially impossible to find pure fluorine in nature, since the highly reactive element readily bonds with any elements it is exposed to. It can also set off extremely explosive reactions which will continue until all of the fluorine has been consumed. Fluorine is also a component in hydrofluoric acid, a compound used in etching, and the gas also has some medical uses. Dentists use sodium fluoride to help their patients establish strong, healthy teeth, and compounds of the gas are also used in anesthetics such as isoflurane. The element is also used in some antibiotics. In trace amounts for medical use, fluorine is combined with other elements so that it is nonreactive and safe. A high intake of fluorides can also be dangerous, leading to serious damage of bones and teeth, as well as corrosion of the intestinal tract. Products with fluorine in them such as fluoroquinolone antibiotics and fluorine based insecticides should be kept away from children and pets. Hope this helps.

az dentists

Fluorine is extremely reactive, and expensive to use in industrial applications because of EPA regulations (HF is a byproduct in the applications I'm familiar with). HF (Hydro-Fluoric acid) is probably the nastiest acid I can think of. It absorbs into your body, and dissolves your bones! doh!

Its used heavily in the coatings industry for glasses, sunglasses, and lenses. Ever notice that interesting color film on the lenses of some of the expensive sunglasses or computer monitors?...chances are its something like Calcium or Magnesium Fluoride used as a anti-reflective coating.

Yeah hydrofluoric acid is hellish -

it is EXCRUCIATINGLY painful to get on your skin,
as it starts precipitating calcium fluoride crystals in your nerve endings, causing them to perpetually fire pain signals. Yikes!

Fluorine is the source of a controversy that continues to rage in many countries, regarding the "fluoridition" of domestic mains tap water supply.
Some countries put fluoride salts in the tap water, as these are meant to prevent tooth decay.
Opponents say this is compulsory medication, and people who drink a lot of tap water will get poisoned by fluoride toxicity.

Re: Fluorine Project!! :-D

[quote="RhiNin21"][color=purple] Hi everyone! I just joined this site after finding information on fluorine for a science project. It seems really interesting, especially since I don't usually apprciate science. I just started this thread to talk about fluorine, so maybe I can get some help on finding 2 more interesting facts about this element. Thanks everyone.[/color][/quote]

Fluorine, and it's acid, hydrofluoric acid (HF) are two of the few things that react with glass. HF has to be stored in wax bottles.

Fluorine is so reactive that water will burn in a fluorine atmosphere.

While we're on the subject, I heard somewhere that some nutters did actually react fluorine (the most reactive non-metal) with cesium (the most reactive metal available in any quantity) directly in the middle of an Australian desert and filmed the results. Has anyone seen this footage or is it just an urban myth?

Jason

Urban Myth.

Woooah. I don't think I'd want to be anywhere near Australia during that experiment! It does sound like an Urban Myth, though. Perhaps it should go on one of those Myth Busters shows. 8)

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