shipping prices.

Sorry, this was the only forum I could think of. I'm also sorry to have ended a sentence with a preposition.
Anyhoo, I want to buy some periodic mugs, but I live in the Us, so I will probably have to pay for the shipping. Where would I go to find the shipping price?

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

Re: shipping prices.

[quote="MM. Trebuchet"]Sorry, this was the only forum I could think of. I'm also sorry to have ended a sentence with a preposition.
Anyhoo, I want to buy some periodic mugs, but I live in the Us, so I will probably have to pay for the shipping. Where would I go to find the shipping price?[/quote]

There is a "Contact us" link on the left menu panel in the shop

Shipping is calculated upon package weight and location to which it is shipped. For this reason the shop can only provide shipping costs once you have entered your address (at the checkout). At that point you have the option to proceed or to not proceed.

If you are buying more than about 4 it may be better to use UPS rather than air mail - please contact me by email on shop followed by the @ sign followed by webelements.com for a quote.

Regretably we make nothing on shipping :( .

You did not end a sentence in a preposition; the word [of] in your sentence is a particle, which, unlike a preposition does not govern a nominal but modifies the meaning of the verb. English uses particles all the time. Notice that while you CAN move the particle in [I will put out Sheba] to [I will put Sheba out], if you change the direct object to a pronoun, you MUST move the particle. [I will put out her] is an ungrammatical sentence while [I will put her out] is correct. It was doubtless this fact which caused Fowler's
Modern English Usage, 2nd ed. Oxford University Press (1965:473) to label this bogus rule of English "a cherished superstition"; Fowler goes on to note that the mobilty of particles and of relative pronouns (which does leave genuine prepositions at the end) is "an important element in the flexibility of the language" (474). Pax vobiscum.

WebElements: the periodic table on the WWW [http://www.webelements.com/]

Copyright 1993-20010 Mark Winter [The University of Sheffield and WebElements Ltd, UK]. All rights reserved.