Francium/astatine

Hi,

The pisture of Francium and Astatine are the same !!

Thanks

Denis

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I believe Fr's melting point

I believe Fr's melting point will be below that of Cs because of the general trend of the alkali metals, even if it's radius is smaller then Cs.

As for halogen colors, believe atomic spectra would be affective for determining it's color if someone could manage to moniter a large enough isolated sample.

But looking at the pattern...
F - Yellow
Cl - yellow green
Br - Red
I - Violet.
It seems as if it is taking a primary color (red, blue, green,) and then adding Blue for the next halogen. Well, given the only color left is... Blue, and the next halogen would also be blue (blue+blue=blue)

my guess would be At is Blue.

I'd like to bring up another subject.

Unbibium (Ubb), element 122, could recently have been discovered occurring naturally . This could be AMAZING. It could prove Seaborg's idea that the nuclei are composed of shells like election shells and could change our model of the atom a tiny bit. Very interesting. I wonder as to how the periodic table would look given the addition of Ubb..

natural traces of Fr & At

The reason the picture is the same is that it is a sample of uraninite. Because Uranium decays naturally, any sample of U-ore will contain small quanities of Fr and At at any given time. To date, no large quantities of either element have been prepared, which is a shame. I've always wanted to know what At vapor looks like. All of the other halogens are colored vapors; F is yellowish, Cl green-yellow, Br red-brown, and I violet.

Fr would be a soft, perhaps liquid metal that would require handling under oil or kerosene (like Na, K, Rb, & Cs) for it would burn brilliantly upon exposure to air. Again in macroscopic quantities its relatives burn with colored flames, so Fr probably does also, but its extremely short half-life precludes observation. :cry:

i am sad too for these things :cry:

They come from the same picture--- however they are from different parts of the picture. The black part is mainly Astatine. The silver part is mainly Francium.

Don't be sad. It'll be okay.

It should be possible to make an educated guess at what colour astatine vapour would be, surely?
MO theory must have some opinions on what the At-At bonding would be like, and thus what wavelengths of light would be absorbed?
And you've all those other halogens to make comparisons with when evaluating the theoretical predictions.

[quote="feline1"]It should be possible to make an educated guess at what colour astatine vapour would be, surely?
MO theory must have some opinions on what the At-At bonding would be like, and thus what wavelengths of light would be absorbed?
And you've all those other halogens to make comparisons with when evaluating the theoretical predictions.[/quote]

Heh. I was thinking along the exact same lines. You figure that it would be colored in some manner or another, provided that it's not a metal. There is a chance that it could be metallic, but I would highly doubt that.

With Francium, I'd have to say that it would be a liquid metal. With the trend seen in the melting points of the other alkali metals, it's melting point would be lower than that of cesium and cesium melts VERY slightly above room temperature.

it had been known (i don't know who figured that out) that francium melts at 25'C.

I read somewhere that there is no more than 25g of Astatine in the Earth's crust at any given time.

and I can imagine if that small amount could be obtained ..anybody foolheartedly enough to take a picture without major protection would be dead not long afterward.

Ya, that's brillant for the guy who discovered the existance of Francium.

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