Bismuth subsalicylate

Why is it that when bismuth is combined with salicylate, or salicylic acid, (as in Pepto-Bismol), it is a digestive system reliever? More interestingly, why does the medication turn the tongue and stool black? (It can also make the tongue "hairy.") I have looked at all the medical sites and all I can find out is [i]that[/i] it turns them black, not [i]why[/i]. I also read that salicylic acid can be used in dyes. Is that one reason?

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Re: Bismuth subsalicylate

[quote="katiejh"]Why is it that when bismuth is combined with salicylate, or salicylic acid, (as in Pepto-Bismol), it is a digestive system reliever? More interestingly, why does the medication turn the tongue and stool black? (It can also make the tongue "hairy.") I have looked at all the medical sites and all I can find out is [i]that[/i] it turns them black, not [i]why[/i]. I also read that salicylic acid can be used in dyes. Is that one reason?[/quote]

I think the 'blackness' results from the bismuth ion being reduced to pure bismuth metal which stains the tongue and the stools.

You know more than I do, first I've to say. What is the formula of salicylic acid?

I thought Salicylic acid is Asprin, the pain reliever/blood thinner?

I thought this too, actually

I thought this too, actually I never sensed aspirin is a pain reliever. I always used other drugs for that. Surprisingly I found that [url=https://www.planetdrugsdirect.com/]cheap medications[/url] do a good job, regardless the price.

[quote="scarf"]I thought Salicylic acid is Asprin, the pain reliever/blood thinner?[/quote]
As well as being a promotor of stomach ulcers

Aspirin is acetylsalicilic acid and not salicilic only. Salicilic acis is something which is used to produce acetilsalicilic acid...the formula of aspirin is like a bencene with a carboxilic acid and besides that, an ester.

as for what bismuth itself gets up to,
I'm not too sure -
it has "no biological role", in that as far as we know,
it doesn't ordinarily form a part of any enzymes or other molecules in the body.

I'd guess (and this is only a guess) that it just acts by being a bit basic and controlling pH in the alimentary canal - I doubt it even gets absorbed by the gut wall.

I'm pretty sure that the most frequent occurrance of blackened stool is where you're hemorrhaging somewhere in the intestinal tract, which makes me wonder why they don't make a warning on Pepto-Bismol, like "If your stool turns black upon taking our product, you do not have Ebola; you are just experiencing the wonderful effects of passing any stool at all."

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