Ways to make a 13 year old male enjoy sience.....

ok. so science. well i need many o' ways that will help me enjoy science, like doing awsome stuff that will create a mess. lol. well jk. no not jk i think. i just wanna find a way to make me science fun. i do good in science at school, infact i do great, but i dont enjoy it. :cry: lol. so i need help on the double! ok so thats where u geniuses come in. help me! lol. ok i need a cool expirement with house hold items, and that will intrege me. ok thanks! :P

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I did my Part II with Fraser Armstrong,
metalloprotein electrochemisty - http//www.chem.ox.ac.uk/researchguide/faarmstrong.html

what I enjoyed more than anything else was just really being able to focus in depth on something that I was interested in and get on with thinking around it, rather than being told "right, this week, you need to answer these 5 pages of questions on nucleophilic substitution" yawn yawn yawn

When i was 13. I enjoyed chemistry. I spent my spare time in doing chemistry experiments at home rather than making up with powder on face or flowers on hair like other little girls did. :D Those experiments with thinking about "what?","why?" and "how comes?" brought me lots of fun in studying chemistry and other science courses in middle school.

One of the experiments that i can remember very clear as many years past is making a mini-flamethrower geting use of my fathers cigarette package papers. It turned out a sucessful test though, to be honest, unfortunetly at the end of the test, it burned a few books and made my bed room smoky. It was no danger after it was stamped out in time. So i closed the door, giving the time to let the smoke disappear and told my mum that i would go to see my greatmother. I was very happy nobody noticed what happened when i came back home after a while. So i continued to do my next test.

No matter a boy or a girl, if you keep curious and thinking with your heart, life would be much more enjoyable, it's proved in my life, and now i'm much older than 13 years old. :D

Emma

Organics blah!

I suggest going with the fuel cell research....graduate then get a job with a startup fuel cell company....create some new sort of membrane or electrode or whatever you organic people do, get some stock options then when the company is bought out for $$$$$$$$$ by Siemens or BP or some other large corp., retire to an island somewhere. Thats my goal hehe

My "senior design" project was to design a new ceramic substrate for electronics, and we didn't have a choice....it is predetermined by the professor in charge of it that particular year. I didn't enjoy it much, but i guess I gained some experience.

My personal project right now is synthesis of rubies, and zapping the bugs that hide in the basement with me. I've got a 15,000V power supply connected to two strips of Stainless shim stock seperated by about 1.5cm across the floor of my doorway. The centipedes and roaches really explode :!:

surely the big agri-petro-chemical-biotech companies tend to try and stamp out on these alternative energy technologies?
that's what they've been doing for years anyways...

I have a sound source that tells me that Prof. Armstrong's group is close to taking a patent out on one of his organometallic fuel cell thingies.

As for me, I'm one for just doing an interesting part II (ion mobility spectroscopy please), then abandoning chemistry to do a job that actually involves me helping other people first hand. I'm not a man after the money. I just do chemistry because it's interesting. Oh, and I might take up secondary level teaching in the long term, but certainly not straight away.

[size=3]me, me, me, me, me![/size]

I started doing some private tutoring this year, for A level and firstyear undergrad students, it's quite fun (and helps bring in a little extra money)

I'd no idea Fraser had been making fuel cells! When I was there it was all just film voltammetry and hyperthermophilic archaebacteria and ferredoxins and succinate dehyrdogenase and such gubbins.

[quote="feline1"]I started doing some private tutoring this year, for A level and firstyear undergrad students, it's quite fun (and helps bring in a little extra money)[/quote]
Sounds like a good idea.
Do you need training for that, or just set it up yourself?

[quote="feline1"]I'd no idea Fraser had been making fuel cells! When I was there it was all just film voltammetry and hyperthermophilic archaebacteria and ferredoxins and succinate dehyrdogenase and such gubbins.[/quote]
A clever man, know's where the money is now.

In the UK, anyone with a degree can teach that subject in tertiary education (ie Further Education colleges) without needing further qualifications.

For private tutoring, you can just put small ads in the paper yourself, but I signed up to an agency (so they find students for me, and take a cut of the fees)

From what I remember Fraser telling me, most of the money in Britain is inside St John's College.... they have to sit and toast the assets every year, takes them most of the weekend. The bottles of port they used cos more than my education lol

What an unfortunate college.
I'm sure if they ask nicely, I could take some of that money away from them...

A good majority of the "Big petro" companies are diving into R&D of alternative energy sources...they realized oil isn't going to be around forever. I think BP has bought up alot of wind technology for example...

Bush is pumping gobs of money into fuel cell development, from the solid oxide type to the proton exchange type......and the newest buzz is some enzyme/biological fuel cell.

In other words, lots of opprotunities, lots of money in it right now.

Feline - they are ironing out problems right now such as platinum as the electrode materials in the plastic ones = $$$$$$ durability problems (easily poisoned by Sulfer etc), and the fuel storage systems (who the heck wants 5 pounds of compressed hydrogen driving around with them?). Very complicated systems, with lots of new age materials that aren't very well understood. Its not being hindered by oil companies, its being hindered by inherent problems with any complicated system =P

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