Ways to make a 13 year old male enjoy sience.....

ok. so science. well i need many o' ways that will help me enjoy science, like doing awsome stuff that will create a mess. lol. well jk. no not jk i think. i just wanna find a way to make me science fun. i do good in science at school, infact i do great, but i dont enjoy it. :cry: lol. so i need help on the double! ok so thats where u geniuses come in. help me! lol. ok i need a cool expirement with house hold items, and that will intrege me. ok thanks! :P

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have you tried imaging what your teacher looks like naked?
that always kept me going when I was 13...

When I was 13 he doubled as the gym coach so I didn't have to imagine, and it was pretty gross!!!

It's hard to say what will intrigue a 13 year-old who doesn't spell very well. What are you looking for? Is this one of those lame open-house projects they inflict on kids in school to extertain the parents? Thermite, a mixture of simple rust and powdered aluminum that can be purchased at an art supply store make a spectacular (and very dangerous) explosion. Nitrogen triiodide is a spectacularly unstable compound which can be made with a few household chemicals, but homeland security doesn't want that spread around. Napalm can be made with a few old styrofoam cups and the right solvents. Small bits of aluminum foil boiled in a solution of washing soda will liberate hydrogen, an explosive gas; you can create your own private Hindenberg.

My own favorite activity at that age, other than strolling among lepidodendra, was adding NaHSO4 to Clorox to produce Cl; the Cl gas was then passed through a clear solution of NaBr to liberate reddish bromine which could be gently heated to give a red-orange gas which was sent through a tube into a clear solution of NaI which turned black as the I was liberated; upon heating the iodine vaporized and gave a violet gas which can be collected by placing a dish of ice on the top to make the I crystalize out.

Either you have an interest in chemistry, the idea that nature is composed of a limited number of basic substances and in principal everything can be duplicated in the lab -- in the 19th century violets were solidified in melted lard, which picked up the delicate scent which was then distilled from the fat and violet oil ran hundreds of $$$ to the ounce; then a chemist discovered that castor oil heated with washing sode made the same thing and violet oil plunged in price -- or you think that the earth was made exactly as it is today in 6 days with no care or washing instructions included.

If you are looking for a lame open house project, I can suggest some that are cheap and easy, if you want to be inspired by chemistry, see if you can get your hands on Glenn Seaborg's Elements of the Universe.

[quote="Martin17"]When I was 13 he doubled as the gym coach so I didn't have to imagine, and it was pretty gross!!![/quote]
That sort of thing wasn't allowed when I was 13.
Indeed, it don't think it's ever been allowed whilst I've been at school. Teach always has a seperate room.

[quote="Martin17"]Nitrogen triiodide is a spectacularly unstable compound which can be made with a few household chemicals, but homeland security doesn't want that spread around.[/quote]
What is it with nitrogen triiodide?
We made it at school all the time, great fun.
I think teach played some practical jokes with it on teacher training days ago, matron was not happy :lol:
But yea, why exactly is it dangerous? Is it just 'if you make too much, you might inhale too much I[size=8]2[/size] powder', which will probably not be all that good for your lungs, or is there some other danger I'm missing?

[quote="Martin17"]Either you have an interest in chemistry, the idea that nature is composed of a limited number of basic substances and in principal everything can be duplicated in the lab... or you think that the earth was made exactly as it is today in 6 days with no care or washing instructions included.[/quote]
I do hope this isn't another person saying 'science disproves the existance of God' :roll:
There are many thousands of Christian Scientists (especially physicists), especially attributed to the fact that there are so many things science [i]can't[/i] answer!

Bro...

No bro... I am a christian, and do have a strong beleif in god, and i know that he created everything. Bow down before him and lay ur life in his hands, and trust him, and preach, and u shall recieve the most awsome gift ever.

Science is perfectly good

Science is perfectly good but some things are just fiction. I believe what your wrote here and this is the true way we should follow. I'm trying to explain to my kids, as well as to my workmates, from San Jose landscaping company. I really believe that after a while they will all get to understand this simple facts.

oh wait...

oh wait, u were talkin to martian sorry. but martian trust in the Lord! :D

perhaps then, you should pray to the Lord and ask Him to help you enjoy chemistry more? lol

Or maybe He made you stoopid for a reason, and you should respect his will )

[quote="feline1"]perhaps then, you should pray to the Lord and ask Him to help you enjoy chemistry more? :lol: [/quote]
Not that bad an idea.
Three years in, and chemistry is becoming a tad boring here.

Was *much* more fun at school.
In 3 years we have only had 1 fun experiment demonstrated in lectures (and one interesting/fun borderline) :(

Yeah but your Part II research year will more than make up for it...

[quote="feline1"]Yeah but your Part II research year will more than make up for it...[/quote]
....meh
mebbie, mebbie not.
http://physchem.ox.ac.uk/~vallance/CVresearch.html
The ion mobility spectra one.

That's what I have my eye on (don't let anybody know, don't want to have someone better than me pick it!)

I'm the sort of person who isn't really satisfied with just making a spectrum, just synthesising a molecule that has potentially wonderful medical applications. Because in all of those things, I'm just doing and getting a result, and saying 'ohh, that's interesting'

What I like to do is work on something where I can actually *see* what use it will go to. That basically restricts me to this one and fuel cells with Prof. Armstrong (organometallics). I did originally want to do dendron synthesis with Dr. Burn in the DP (well, CRL now geography have taken over the DP), but it turns out you slave away there, make your target molecule, then send the results off to Leeds, where they do fun stuff with it.

So I don't see part II as being fun, but yea, I guess (severely hope) it will be more interesting, because I'll actually be thinking for myself again.

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