Chemical reactions

Hey. I am getting into chemical reactions, and was wondering if there were any basic house hold elements that i could use to observe chemical reactions. I would really appreticate any sugestions. Thanks! :)

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Take some play-doh (sp?), mould it into a volcano (with the hole in the middle).

Place some bicarb of soda in the hole, a little red food colouring (for effect), then add vinegar.

Hey presto, a 'real' volcano. You'll need to experiment to get the right mixtures of both, and do it on a surface that can be cleaned!

I loved that reaction when I was little. A basic acid+base reaction:

NaHCO[size=8]3[/size] + AcOH → CO[size=8]2(g)[/size] + H[size=8]2[/size]O + NaOAc

(Ac = Acetate; AcOH = CH[size=8]3[/size]COOH, an acid)

yea but...

I have done simple things like that when i was younger, but do u have any other ideas that a 13 year old male would enjoy? Thanks! :P [color=darkblue][/color][size=9][/size]

maybe.............

Maybe anything w/ small but satisfing explosion? lol. well anything is alright.Thanks! :P [color=darkblue][/color]

I'm not one to practice explosions in the home - that's what the lab is for (well, at least at school it was).

There is a book, I know not of it's name, but it contains lots of reactions like what you are after, alhough some of them could probably be scaled up a bit too much, from what I have heard!

Anyways, I dunno if you will get any answers in here about how to make explosions.
People may be worried about the wrong sorts of people getting easyier access to potentially dangerous information...

ya lol.......

ya lol i guess ur right about that 1. I understand, i was just tring to make science fun.

If you want fun, go play sports.

If you don't know the reactions to cause explosions then you obviously don't know the techniques to do it safely. If you don't know the techniques then it's best you don't learn about explosives.

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