znso4 + cu

hello!
i was wondering if someone could explain to me why does the reaction CuSO4+Zn results in Cu+ZnSO4, but the reaction doesn`t take place the other way around (ZnSO4+Cu doesn`t produce Zn+CuSO4).

thanks alot!!!

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Oooh, I know this one :)

When Zn is placed in a solution of CuSO4, the Zn is more reactive than the Cu, and so takes the place of the Cu

When Cu is placed in the ZnSO4, Zn is still the more reactive one, and so the Cu is unable to replace the Zn.

The less reactive metal will always be deposited... I think.

You don't have to think :wink: , you are correct

Actually, both reactions Zn + CuSO4 > ZnSO4 + Cu and
Cu + ZnSO4 > CuSO4 + Zn

occur simultaneously, but at normal conditions, the rate of the first equation far outstrips the rate of the second, so the first occurs macroscopically, but every now and then a Cu atoms picks up enough energy to displace a Zn ion, which then immediately displaces a Cu ion.

[quote="Martin17"]Actually, both reactions Zn + CuSO4 > ZnSO4 + Cu and
Cu + ZnSO4 > CuSO4 + Zn

occur simultaneously, but at normal conditions, the rate of the first equation far outstrips the rate of the second, so the first occurs macroscopically, but every now and then a Cu atoms picks up enough energy to displace a Zn ion, which then immediately displaces a Cu ion.[/quote]
Read: [b]The two reactions are in equilibrium[/b]

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