theoretical yield

how do you find the theoretical yield for 2.033g of MgO thats heated in the air? and how would you calculate the percent yield for 1.152g og MgO? for the percent yield its the actual yield over theoretical yield multiplied by 100%... right?

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Re: theoretical yield

[quote="srosierose"]how do you find the theoretical yield for 2.033g of MgO thats heated in the air? and how would you calculate the percent yield for 1.152g og MgO?[/quote]
Sorry, are we heating up MgO in the air and forming some other product, or are we heating Mg and making MgO?

[quote="srosierose"]for the percent yield its the actual yield over theoretical yield multiplied by 100%... right?[/quote]
Yup, that's right

it says suppose 2.033g of magnesium is heated in the air. what is the theoretical yield of magnesium oxide that should be produced?

OK, that's easy(ish) then.

You've got to get your head around the whole 'moles' thing - it's just a number, and beofre you know it, it'll be second nature to use it (if it isn't already..)

So you have 2.033g of Mg - RMM 24.

Moles = Mass

I've noticed you use alot of different terms for various chemistry items over seas. What exactly does RMM stand for? I, for the life of me, cannot figure out this acronym.

Relative Molecular Mass.

So really it should be used for molecules only, but I'm lazy and use it for individual atoms as well.

It's easier than using M[size=8]r[/size] and A[size=8]r[/size], especially as they have different meanings sometimes.

Not that I can remember any of them at this moment in time...

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