The electron movement...

May I know what is the moving speed of an electron in its orbit?
And how does a shared electron move in covalent bonding? :?

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/laughs/

this is where our nice little mental pictures and concepts of these things completely break down.

It is not a good description of an electron, to think of it as a particle whizzing round a nucleus on a little 'orbit'.

Another description is to think of the electron smeared out along the oribtal in a 'wave'... some bits are more dense than others.....

When molecules for, the atomic orbitals merge to form "molecular orbitals" (MOs), and the "shared pairs" of electrons occupy these MOs...

Quantum mechanics can tell you some rather complicated mathematical descriptions of the shapes of the orbitals....

[quote="feline1"]/laughs/

this is where our nice little mental pictures and concepts of these things completely break down.

It is not a good description of an electron, to think of it as a particle whizzing round a nucleus on a little 'orbit'.

Another description is to think of the electron smeared out along the oribtal in a 'wave'... some bits are more dense than others.....

When molecules for, the atomic orbitals merge to form "molecular orbitals" (MOs), and the "shared pairs" of electrons occupy these MOs...

Quantum mechanics can tell you some rather complicated mathematical descriptions of the shapes of the orbitals....[/quote]

I see... thank you very much... lol
but my dad's answer is 'it will use whatever way to round the nucleus'... = ="
well...... how many seconds does an electron use to complete a round of its orbit?
( sorry for those grammer errors... but I really don't know how to explain my question... T____T )

The thing is, the electron doesn't really "orbit" around the nucleus. Nobody is sure of exactly what path the electron takes as Mr. Heisenberg says that it's impossible to figure that out. We basically know that the electrons exist, and that there are defined areas where we can expect to find them. What we don't know is what path they are taking and where they are at any given moment. In fact, we don't even have any clue what an electron looks like. The joys of quantum mechanics. The more you think about it, the more you want to put a gun in your mouth. lol. :P

The speed of the electron depends on which orbit it is in. The 1s electron in Gold travels approximately 0.6 the speed of light.

N. Kaltsoyannis, [i]J. Chem. Soc. Dalton Trans.[/i] [b]1997[/b] 1.

[quote="Jdurg"]The thing is, the electron doesn't really "orbit" around the nucleus. Nobody is sure of exactly what path the electron takes as Mr. Heisenberg says that it's impossible to figure that out. We basically know that the electrons exist, and that there are defined areas where we can expect to find them. What we don't know is what path they are taking and where they are at any given moment. In fact, we don't even have any clue what an electron looks like. The joys of quantum mechanics. The more you think about it, the more you want to put a gun in your mouth. lol. :P[/quote]
Oh... I see...
then it means that we have to wait for the higher tech's microscope before we can know how electrons really look like and how they move... :(

[quote]The speed of the electron depends on which orbit it is in. The 1s electron in Gold travels approximately 0.6 the speed of light.

N. Kaltsoyannis, J. Chem. Soc. Dalton Trans. 1997 1.[/quote]
Thanks for your information... lol
Would the speed changes in the other electrons?
and would the speed depends on the electronegative value of the atom?

people did wonder if the "inert pair effect" was because electrons were moving so close to the speed of light that they experienced relativistic mass increase!

not close enough.

While I know that it's not a good idea to say "never" when dealing with scientific topics, but we'll NEVER be able to use a microscope to get a "picture" of an electron. In order to "see" something, you have to bounce a particle or wave off of it. We see things due to photons which bounce off of objects and into our eyes. The electron is so fantastically light, however, that anything we bounce off of it will cause the electron to go flying off in a different direction. It would be like trying to observe a ping pong ball by throwing a bowling ball at it. :lol: That's kind of the basics behind the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle.

currently can't. however the wavelengths can be shorter and shorter in the future.

the shorter the wavelength (higher the frequency) you move from the visible to UV to X-Ray to gamma..... and these photons are more and more penetrating and so can't focus on stuff.
A gamma ray photon, if it interacted with electrons in an atom, would tend to just zap them out and ionize the atom.

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