-ine? -ide? @_@

I'm so confused.... when do I add -ine and when do I add -ide?

I'm so not the science type I'm sorry...

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Thanks very

Thanks very much
[url=http://www.google.com]ser[/url]

Easy the "-ide" suffix usually denotes that something has turned into an anion.

And come on, it not just "science" where words change their endings to denote different things...

Even in a crap language like English, we add "s" to nouns to denote the plural, and apostrophe s to denote the possessive....
and "-ing" and "-ed" to various verbs to denote differnt tenses,
and "-ly" to denote adverbs....

In general the suffix -ine denotes an elemental substance like chlorine with only atoms of chlorine present; -ide is used when the atoms are attracted to a different kind of atom such as NaCl sodium chlorIDE in which the chlorine atoms are goings steady with sodium atoms. There are a few cases such as amide in which an ammonia molecule is bound to something else; these are relicts of alchemy when ammonia was thought of as an elemental substance. We now know that it is NH3.

-ine is the suffix for a halogen, eg Chlorine, Iodine
-ide is the suffix for an anion, eg Chloride, Iodide

do you always add the ide even if its not a ionic bond? like if water wasn't called water would it be hydrogen oxide?

yeah, hydrogen dioxide, why not?

I'm sure you've heard of its cousin, carbon dioxide -)

I just heated up some dihydrogen oxide for tea.

As Oxygen has a higher electronegativity, ie. ease in stealing electrons, than Hydrogen, the electron from Hydrogen is usually stolen by the oxygen, producing an

[size=18]H[/size]+~[size=18]O[/size]2^2-~[size=18]H[/size]+

ionic bond. This is also known as the 'Hydrogen bond'. This happens also in Ammonia (Nitrogen stealing) and Methane (Carbon and Hydrogen stealing each other's)

[quote="feline1"]yeah, hydrogen dioxide, why not?[/quote]
O[size=7]2[/size]H?

Dihydrogen monoxide methinks.

Dangerous stuff...:
Among the many commonly-sited DHMO-related environmental impacts are:

oops! yeah, sorry,
dihydrogen oxide, not huydrogen dioxide! oops

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