Extracting Silver.

Hi. this is my first post, but i'm determined to find some answers. :lol: Now, i've acquired some silver solder and it's, what, some 67% silver. So i've found out that silver boils at some 2000+K. So is there a way to extract the silver from this silver solder by fractional distillation in a lab?

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Both ZnCl2 and CuCl/CuCl2 are soluble, so extraction by dissolving the solder in nitric acid and then precipitating the chloride should work fine. Instead of hydrochloric acid, you could use salt water which would add Na to the solute and produce a less hazardous product than nitric acid, you would have in effect a solution of sodium, zinc and copper nitrate.

i last thing, would the metal be pure enough for electroplating?[/i]

If you intend to electroplate, purification may be an unnecessary step. Electrodeposition has traditionally been one of the techniques used to prepare ultrapure samples of metals. The impure metal is used as the anode and a small pure sample serves as the cathode and the electric current is passed through depositing pure metal on the ode.

With silverplating, the thing you need to worry about is crystalization. Silver is often deposited in crystaline form that is unacceptable. The solution for plating is usually sodium argenticyanide, Na.Ag(CN)2 made by dissolving Na(CN) in AgNO3. First Ag(CN) is formed and precipitates out, but the Ag(CN) is dissolved in further Na(CN) to give soluble Na.Ag(CN)2. Gelatin is added to the solute to minimize the possible crystalization of the deposited Ag.

If you intend to electroplate, purification may be an unnecessary step. Electrodeposition has traditionally been one of the techniques used to prepare ultrapure samples of metals. The impure metal is used as the anode and a small pure sample serves as the cathode and the electric current is passed through depositing pure metal on the anode.

With silverplating, the thing you need to worry about is crystalization. Silver is often deposited in crystaline form that is unacceptable. The solution for plating is usually sodium argenticyanide, Na.Ag(CN)2 made by dissolving Na(CN) in AgNO3. First Ag(CN) is formed and precipitates out, but the Ag(CN) is dissolved in further Na(CN) to give soluble Na.Ag(CN)2. Gelatin is added to the solute to minimize the possible crystalization of the deposited Ag.

would it be possible using AgNO3 for the process of silver plating? what about the ideal voltage for the best results? does anyone know?

Nitrics are not necessary. They tend to destroy your product rather than building up them. (I'm not sure if that's totally correct as I'm not a factory manager)

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