Why do we say Positron not Positon?

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because it sounds better. ;)

!??

"PositRon" is meant to be analogous to "electRon"

if we said "positon" it would sound more like "position" lol
(and we'd have elections whizzing round the nucleus lol )

I wonder who coined the terms,
does anyone know?
Or should I just ask google...? twisted

Particles seem to end -on not -ron.
For example Prot[b]on[/b], Mu[b]on[/b], Pi[b]on[/b] etc....

As I understand it electron comes from [b]electr[/b]icity [b]-on[/b]
So it should follow that [b]posit[/b]ive [b]-on[/b] would make more sence than positron.

Well I don't know about it making "sence" lol

but the *sense* of it can be further illuminated by comparison
with "neutRon"

we have electRon, neutRon and positRon....

.....pRotRon would have too many Rs, so we prefer just 'proton'

I also liked it when Rick Wakeman played his mellotron... wink

allllllllllso,

in English, the word or syllable "ton" generally doesn't rhyme with
the word "on" or the name "John",
but instead with the word "tonne" or "done" or "sun" (or indeed "son" ;-)

eg "London" is usually pronounced "lun-done"
(or "Laaaaaahndaaaaaaaahnnn", if you're from south of the river lol )

but only really silly people like Americans would ever say "Lohn-donne"

Hence spelling a word "POSITON" would be ahine

[quote="feline1"]

we have electRon, neutRon and positRon....

[/quote]

[b]Electr[/b]icity [b]-on[/b]
[b]Neutr[/b]al [b]-on[/b]
[b]Posit[/b]ive [b]-on[/b] (seems to be a missing R)

[quote="feline1"]
.....pRotRon would have too many Rs, so we prefer just 'proton'
[/quote]

Proton comes from the Greek word Protos meaning first as it was the first particle discovered.

[b]Prot[/b]os [b]-on[/b]

Yeah - that Greek heritage is what lends itself to proton,
electron, neutron etc etc all being pronounced with a long "on"
sound (to rhyme with John) -

cf similar works with Greek lineage, such as aeon, panopticon, neon, argon, krypton, xenon, and ouzo... wink

[quote="feline1"]Yeah - that Greek heritage is what lends itself to proton,
electron, neutron etc etc all being pronounced with a long "on"
sound (to rhyme with John) -

cf similar works with Greek lineage, such as aeon, panopticon, neon, argon, [b]krypton[/b], xenon, and ouzo... :wink:[/quote]

I like the theory but you have to take into account Lepton, Proton, Graviton, Photon and [b]Krypton[/b]. :?

So, why not Positon? :wink:

we already told you HOURS ago!?!

Because "PositRon" sounds better! (and provides a nice
inverse to "electRon")

"positon" (with a "on" rhyming with "John") would be an ugly collection of syllables in English.
When new words enter a language, they generally follow the rules of pronounceability first and foremost, above any correctness of etymological derivation.
Languages are governed by the thousands and millions of people who have to SPEAK them, not by a few anal pedants who bleat on about what is "correct" or not.
Any rules of grammar, syntax, spelling and pronunciation in a language are written down and formalised by analysis of what native speakers are already using - not the other way round.
(Of course, pay enough tax money to faceless quangos, and they'll gladly go and have a conference in Hawaii to try and think up some new rules about the correct way to spell the past tense of "Lanthanum", but that's just ahein -)

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