why the light reflected by a object is not theobject'scolour

why the light reflected by a object is not the object's colour but it is sunlight?for example , a black object absorb all colour so we can see it is 'black' but why it still reflect some light when we watch it/

Tags:

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

the phenomenon of 'colour' is simply due to objects absorbing certain wavelengths of light.
(they absorb those wavelengths because they match the gaps between energy levels in the objects molecules - electrons grab the incoming photons and use them to jump between levels)

the exact colour your eyes see just depends on exactly which wavelengths are being absorbed,
AND what wavelengths are present in the light in the first place (ie, sunlight has different wavelengths compared to a light bulb)

Some objects look more black than others! -)

shiny black things? like glossy black plastic? well, i'm guessing here, but i'd hypothesiseiseise that the light frequencies that give things colour are different from the light being reflected off other things or... no. i don't know. this is physics, not chemistry! i hate physics! unless you're talking about colours of chemicals, stay away from that area of stuff. it's evil i tell you.

:cry:

i hate physical chemistry. so bad at it.

if something is "shiny" (or "lustrous") - ie, you can see your reflection in it - this means that it has a crystal or molecular structure which reflects light rays in a coherent manner (ie, they all bounce back off again maintaining their same relative directions)

this would generally not depend on the wavelengths of the light

?

the colour we can see from the object is reflected by the object.For example,plant do not absorb much green light so it reflects and we see as green colour

[quote="sammysam"]shiny black things? like glossy black plastic? well, i'm guessing here, but i'd hypothesiseiseise that the light frequencies that give things colour are different from the light being reflected off other things or... no. i don't know. this is physics, not chemistry! i hate physics! unless you're talking about colours of chemicals, stay away from that area of stuff. it's evil i tell you.

:cry:

i hate physical chemistry. so bad at it.[/quote]

hate to burst your bubble but... chemistry is branch of physics.

really?

Do all chemists sit around watching Star Trek and talk about 'spherical molecules in free space'...?
Do all chemists not bother doing real empirical work but instead try and fudge-factor the data back onto their computer simulations?

I THINK NOT! lol

Chemistry and Physics both have their similarities. What I find to be the greatest difference is that Physicist like to study things and Chemists like to synthesize things and then study them.

About seeing black objects. The light isn't 100% absorbed. The shinyness just proves the point that some light is being reflected back because it's not a perfect black body,

Study things?!

We've seen some typical "physics" on the news yesterday -
Stephen Hawking has made an announcement about a theoretical
breakthrough with "black holes" -
was this because of some exciting new experimental study of them?

No!
Cos no-one's ever even conclusively seen one! lol

All he's doing is revising his existing untested theories!

Can you imagine if chemists got funding to theorise about hypothetical molecules that no-one had ever seen?!

Black Holes do exist........ inside astronomers' heads lol

Chemists do. They are called theoritical Chemists. Just as hawking is a theoritical physicist.

my physical chemistry tutor for three years at Oxford was head of the little Theoretical Chemistry department there -
in a whole three years I never heard him talk anything like as much rubbish as Hawking gives out in a single press release. lol

WebElements: the periodic table on the WWW [http://www.webelements.com/]

Copyright 1993-20010 Mark Winter [The University of Sheffield and WebElements Ltd, UK]. All rights reserved.