which element is the most reactive , Fr or F , the other

which element is the most reactive , Fr or F , the other?

Tags:

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

i reckon F. F's pretty much the most reactive element in the periodic table.. it's the most electronegative, and so it'll react with almost anything, even most of the noble gases (XeF6 etc.) Fr won't react with noble gases.

also, Fr's a pretty big atom, so the bonds that it forms won't be nearly as strong as flourine's. (poorer orbital overlap with high energy levels)

(i think. i'm no chemistry expert.)

moreover, fluorine is quite common,
wheras francium is extreeeeeeeeeeemely scarce.

as such, discussions about how reactive it is are somewhat academic lol

[quote="sammysam"]also, Fr's a pretty big atom, so the bonds that it forms won't be nearly as strong as flourine's. (poorer orbital overlap with high energy levels)
(i think. i'm no chemistry expert.)[/quote]

If the metal`s atom radius is bigger, its ionisation energy is smaller. It means that the Fr atom will dismiss the electron easier (it will react easier). :)

Yeah but the ion will have a loooooow surface charge density,
so there will be less energy payback for forming an ionic lattice....

Also, fluorine doesn't react with all of the noble gasses. Helium is pretty much the most unreactive element on the periodic table. Neon doesn't react with fluorine to my knowledge, and neither does argon. So in actuality, fluorine only reacts with two of the major noble gasses. This reaction is not really all due to fluorine, but more due to the large sizes of the noble gasses krypton and xenon. Those outer electrons really don't feel too much of a pull from the nucleus of said atoms, so all it takes a bit of encouragement to get them to go away. Fluorine has a very strong attraction to electrons, so it's the obvious choice for attempting a reaction.

Guessing about the reactivity of Francium is simply that; guessing. It is quite radioactive, and if you were ever able to generate enough of it to see a reaction, you'd be irradiated to death. You can make an educated guess that it would be quite reactive since it would have a very large atomic radius and that one lone outer electron waiting to jump off at a moment's notice. (I believe that theoretical calculations make it the most electropositive element).

Anyway, you really can't compare an element which exists in large quantities and is well researched to an element that barely exists at all and has had very little research done on it.

I believe that [HArF]^+ can be isolated at 4K
So basically, yes, very little chance of He/Ne/Ar compounds!

geez man,
if you freeze *anything* down to 4K,
it's not gonna have the energy to run away ;-)

Precisely

I think this thread is a great example of where individual bias comes in. How are we defining reactivity? Reactive to oxidation, reduction, bond formation, homolytic bond clevage, heterolytic bond clevage.

Trying to even remotely answer this questions is an endeavor in frutility.

WebElements: the periodic table on the WWW [http://www.webelements.com/]

Copyright 1993-20010 Mark Winter [The University of Sheffield and WebElements Ltd, UK]. All rights reserved.