Helium

Why does helium count as a P block element when its only got a full S shell?

Also.. just another completley unrelated question... If you mixed Caesium and flourine what would happen?

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dont quote me on this but i think its because its a noble gas i dont think it has todo with its valence shell. but i dont know im in chemistry one ;p Just an opinon

Re: Helium

[quote="BigDaveZZ"]Why does helium count as a P block element when its only got a full S shell?[/quote]

As Spy kid says below - it is because there is a filled valence shell of electrons and this is why it is so placed in the standard periodic table.

There are manhy alternative period tables out there - and in some of those helium is placed above beryllium as its electronic structure is 1s2 - clearly related to beryllium's 2s2.

At some point I intend to include some of these alternative periodic tables in WebElements - but this will take a while to set up.

Re: Helium

[quote="BigDaveZZ"]Also.. just another completley unrelated question... If you mixed Caesium and flourine what would happen?[/quote]

There would be a VERY violent explosion. Fluorine is the most electronegative element out there, and Caesium is the most reactive alkali metal. Fluorine would have no problem ripping away Caesium's outermost electron, and will do so quite exothermically. Basically, it's a reaction that you probably would not want to be anywhere close to as it's occuring. :)

Cesium + Flourine = boom :)

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