about CO3 and CO2

i know that CO2 is using colvant bond. but how about carbonate ? can anyone tell me please?thanks :wink:

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Well ..... this is where the simplified notion of bonds either being 100% ionic or 100% covalent turns out to be a bit of a fairy story ;-)

You could think of a carbonate anion as a covalent molecule which has then shed one of its electrons.
However, since covalent bonds are supposed to involve "shared pairs" of elections, this would mean that one of the covalent bonds was half broken....
....in actual fact all the bonds in carbonate are very strong, there's no half-broken weak one in there....
.....we end up explaining it by saying the negative charge is "delocalised" over the whole anion.

stilldont know

i still know , can anyone tell me more? i also want to know does anyone has msn ? it will be great if i chat with you in msn debate on chemistry :lol:

carbonate for all intents and purposes is a covalent molecule, that likes to make ionic bonds. :shock:

[quote]You could think of a carbonate anion as a covalent molecule which has then shed one of its electrons. [/quote]
anions gain electron(s), so the carbonate anion has gained two additional electrons.

The bonds between the carbon and oxygen in carbonate are covalent bonds, but the bond(s) formed between tha cation(s) and the carbonate anion are ionic.

HTH

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